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#2953927 - 10/21/18 07:18 AM What Jimi Hendrix teaches us about escapism.
GregC Offline
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Registered: 10/26/03
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Loc: Discovery Bay, California
https://medium.com/@matthew.bradshawhughes/dismantling-reality-what-jimi-hendrix-teaches-us-about-escapism-a0e49b07c40

[snip]
Growing up in poverty, Jimi Hendrix was shaped by the death of his mother at a young age, his father’s intolerance of his musical gifts during his youth in Seattle, his failure to conform to the military and eventual discharge, the tough life of touring on the road and countless rejections of his sound from numerous musicians, including The Continentals, Hank Ballard and the Midnighters, The Isley Brothers and Little Richard.
With his raw talent and guidance from friends along the way, he began his ascension into the upper echelons of rock history with the help of Linda Keith and Chas Chandler. He changed rock music forever with his electric, psychedelic rock blues that plunged his audience into distorted, colourful and flamboyant worlds that appeared in stark contrast to his experiences of displacement growing up.
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GP Island
#2953928 - 10/21/18 07:21 AM Re: What Jimi Hendrix teaches us about escapism. [Re: GregC]
GregC Offline
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Registered: 10/26/03
Posts: 5791
Loc: Discovery Bay, California
Hendrix visits a newly imagined world in 3rd Stone from the Sun. Not all is as it seems: he describes a bizarre situation in which aliens visit Earth, marvel at the “majestic and superior cackling hen” but disapprove of its people and decide to destroy the planet. What does this say about the way he felt about power structures and the control they impose?

You can’t say it’s boring, can you?

If 6 Was 9 re-imagines new communities of people that reject conformity. Hendrix describes meeting a “white collar conservative pointing his plastic finger at me” with his “freak flag.” What does this say about how he felt about categorisation?
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#2953929 - 10/21/18 07:22 AM Re: What Jimi Hendrix teaches us about escapism. [Re: GregC]
GregC Offline
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Registered: 10/26/03
Posts: 5791
Loc: Discovery Bay, California
[last snip]

Hear My Train A Comin’ captures the fear, confusion and anxiety Hendrix felt as he prepared to leave his hometown of Seattle. His sadness at leaving his family and friends behind is evident throughout the song.
“ Tears burnin’ me
Burnin’ me
Way down in my soul
Way down in my heart”

Yet this feeling of loss co-existed with his desire to expand his musical creativity and can be summed up in these lines of the song:
“ Gonna make it bigger
With all that’s still in my heart
Gonna be a magic boy ooh child
Gonna come back and buy this town
An’ put it all in my shoe
In my shoe baby
You make love to me one more time girl
So I give a piece to you baby”

Jimi’s escapism here runs deep because it’s personal to him. His music plucks at his heartstrings, pushes the right buttons and above all, is an essential part of processing his grief and uncertainty. Escapism here is a coping mechanism not because it opposes the reality of the situation, but because it embraces it.

If this song places him in a genuine context, is it really escapism at all? Shouldn’t there be a degree of separation from reality? The difference lies in Hendrix admitting to himself how he feels and owning it by creating a situation where he can talk to himself, a stark contrast to his upbringing. In response to whether he was an introvert in an interview with Steve Barker in February 1968, Jimi replied “Well, sometimes…you can go back and listen to your own records and know how you were feeling then and how your moods change at different times.”

He went on to say (rather firmly) that he writes primarily for himself.
Why is this important? If Jimi was lost in an ocean, think of his songs as lifeboats. His creations allowed him to process this in a deeply personal way that offered a sense of refuge from the world. Hendrix knew better than anyone the pain of his upbringing, his chaotic survival from pay cheque to pay cheque down South, walking the tight-rope of racial categorisation and the way he was scalded by countless musicians for his sound.
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#2953955 - 10/21/18 01:28 PM Re: What Jimi Hendrix teaches us about escapism. [Re: GregC]
d Offline
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Registered: 03/20/01
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Loc: no longer lexington, Kenfunky,...
Most of that seems reasonable, albeit maybe a bit too specifically literal.
Much art, particularly modern entertainment, involves levels of escapism. Sometimes that can be for relief; sometimes it can be, as George Clinton put it, "to see the picture within the picture behind the picture---what I ain't looking at" (take that, Mr Salvador Picasso !).

While many fans took JH as an excuse to escape, many others took his music as a way to get more real.

As for this...
Originally Posted By: GregC
If Jimi was lost in an ocean, think of his songs as lifeboats.

...well, we have this from the mighty man himself (kinda sorta)...




This one's Jimi but w/out the main lyrics


While many fans took JH as an excuse to escape---& he himself often began his later concerts by suggesting that "we all forget what's out there, tonight there's just what's in here"--- many others took his music as a way to get more real.

Here's JH getting as real as can be.

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#2953960 - 10/21/18 02:01 PM Re: What Jimi Hendrix teaches us about escapism. [Re: d]
GregC Offline
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Registered: 10/26/03
Posts: 5791
Loc: Discovery Bay, California
Originally Posted By: d
Most of that seems reasonable, albeit maybe a bit too specifically literal.
Much art, particularly modern entertainment, involves levels of escapism. Sometimes that can be for relief; sometimes it can be, as George Clinton put it, "to see the picture within the picture behind the picture---what I ain't looking at" (take that, Mr Salvador Picasso !).

While many fans took JH as an excuse to escape, many others took his music as a way to get more real.




I can agree with that.

What I like about the article is the belief or research of what was behind Jimi's creativity. There is usually a fair amount of suffering behind many songs.

Plus Jimi had several dimensions of creativity. His diverse material shows this.
_________________________
Innovation is never a single event. It is a long process of discovery, engineering, and transformation.
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#2953964 - 10/21/18 02:53 PM Re: What Jimi Hendrix teaches us about escapism. [Re: GregC]
d Offline
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Registered: 03/20/01
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Loc: no longer lexington, Kenfunky,...
That's true, although there's a lot of joy in his music as well.
You pont out there were multiple dimensions to his work...that makes ppinning down specific inspiration difficult in some (not all) cases, eh ?

Nice to read yer own opinion rather than just the quotes !
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#2953976 - 10/21/18 04:43 PM Re: What Jimi Hendrix teaches us about escapism. [Re: d]
GregC Offline
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Registered: 10/26/03
Posts: 5791
Loc: Discovery Bay, California
Originally Posted By: d
That's true, although there's a lot of joy in his music as well.
You pont out there were multiple dimensions to his work...that makes ppinning down specific inspiration difficult in some (not all) cases, eh ?

Nice to read yer own opinion rather than just the quotes !


Jimi's music defies standard conventions of that era. He was a unique musician, a helluva
song writer. Personally, I like diversity , hybrid/fusion efforts etc.

BTW, this is my 1st post topic here. I am a song writer/keyboard guy with 40 songs on Sound Cloud[SC].

I use to play some guitar back in the days of covered wagons, the 70's, usual cover stuff.

These days, some of my strongest tunes on SC feature somewhat assertive guitar parts [ played on keys which I know is not optimal].

My keyboard bros are not as interested in creative guitar work as I am.
I thought the Hendrix article might fit over here.
_________________________
Innovation is never a single event. It is a long process of discovery, engineering, and transformation.
My Soundcloud with many originals:
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#2953984 - 10/21/18 06:14 PM Re: What Jimi Hendrix teaches us about escapism. [Re: GregC]
desertbluesman Offline
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Registered: 05/22/07
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Loc: Near Phoenix Az
I never really appreciated Hendrix until I really listened to him later on. probably after his death. Then I realized what a visionary on guitar that he was. Completely all by himself in his originality. I had only seen him on the TV, and many of the videos were showing him playing out of tune and having sloppy fingers (not his best video work by far at that time) Anyways I never really appreciated his guitar work until I saw the Star Spangled Banner in the Woodstock movie. At the time my guitar hero was Eric Clapton, who I saw live at The Electric Factory in Philly at the time of his first Derick and The Dominoes tour. He was stunningly exact in everything he did, I could not believe how exact Eric played, but I was suitably impressed at his craftsmanship. At the same time as that, I was seeing videos of Hendrix playing sloppily (Probably because Michael Jeffrey who worked Hendrix like a slave master) So my respect for him had to wait a few years until I really dug into his work.
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#2954010 - 10/22/18 04:09 AM Re: What Jimi Hendrix teaches us about escapism. [Re: desertbluesman]
whitefang Offline
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I've said it before DBM---

I've seen Hendrix live three times, and NONE of the footage of him in concert that I've seen in other medium (movies, TV, etc.) ever sounded as good as he did when I was THERE to HEAR it!

"Tortured artist"? Aren't MOST of them to some degree? But near as I can hear, none of that really showed up in most of his songs' lyrics that I can tell. Mostly a huge nod to one of his heroes, BOB DYLAN as in Jimi's penchant for word play and writing vivid visual images. And of course, many of the fine blues artists that preceded him. Listen closely and you can hear many well worn blues runs given new life by him just placing a slightly different emphasis on some of the notes.

Oh, and DBM---

I remember reading an interview with Jimi in which HE TOO considered Eric Clapton one of HIS "heroes". Thought you'd get a kick out of that.
Whitefang
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#2954014 - 10/22/18 05:22 AM Re: What Jimi Hendrix teaches us about escapism. [Re: whitefang]
GregC Offline
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Registered: 10/26/03
Posts: 5791
Loc: Discovery Bay, California
If any of you are are close to my age, this might be familiar

House PA systems for concerts in the late 60's/70's could be abysmal.

I grew up in Chicago , went to concerts and can recall how the house PA was crap and they simply cranked up the crap PA which made the music sound more distorted.
Something like that.

I go to few concerts these days and it seems like the venues have gotten it together and spent $. Now , if there is a problem, its localized or the sound man doesn't seem to get it

Eric is tremendous. I saw him with Cream. What great days.

Reminds me of my effort to do a cover ( multi track keyboard guy here) of the Beatles
While My Guitar Gently Weeps. It was coming along decently - until I got to Erics blazing
guitar solo at the end. Play that on keys ? Fergettaboutit. Not even close.
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Innovation is never a single event. It is a long process of discovery, engineering, and transformation.
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#2954050 - 10/22/18 09:58 AM Re: What Jimi Hendrix teaches us about escapism. [Re: GregC]
Larryz Offline
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Stevie Ray and Jimi left us much too soon. They were a pair to draw to. I know Stevie was a fan of Jimi and Jimi was a fan of Dylan. I love them all. I'm glad Clapton and Dylan are still with us as. I feel so lucky to have lived during all of their Hey Days. There are so many more I could list that would join this club. I miss BB, Chuck and Elvis just now, while thinking about the ones I've mentioned so far! cool
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#2954071 - 10/22/18 11:47 AM Re: What Jimi Hendrix teaches us about escapism. [Re: desertbluesman]
d Offline
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Registered: 03/20/01
Posts: 7043
Loc: no longer lexington, Kenfunky,...
This is where I disagree w/many abt JH.
He was so much more than a great guitarist.
As GregC mentioned earlier, he was really a groundbreaking composer whose work went far beyond thoughtful lyrics or interesting gtr playing.

Much as what Lennon-McC did w/G Martin, he actually did things both re:music theory & in compositional form that had no real precedent, at least in pop music...or in any of the music he drew from.
His consistent use of dom 7b9 chords is preshaded by stuff like Scriabin's "mystic chord" but we can be fairly sure that, unlike say Zappa, Jimim never listened to much classical music.
Even more striking to me is stuff like his recasting of Bob the Dyl's "Watch Yer Tower". grin
Or what abt this tune?
All the gtr FX are striking & significant to the composition but strip it down tho just it's basics of chord progression & all the extra beats/ritards & actually cosider where that stuff came from.
Who else was doing anything like that on a purely musical level ?



Or this one...where's he draw that shift to the #V for the refrain ?! freak


Some bg info but no real explanation...


Special bonus clips just for kicks !
Xperienced / Hey Joe / Wild Thang


This one's a bit better recorded
Stone Free / P Haze / Hey Jude facepalm


At risk of too much of a G Thang
1 more but you can get the best value by dialing up the 9:00 min mark & listening to the verbal & instrumental intro to the last tune

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#2954104 - 10/22/18 02:58 PM Re: What Jimi Hendrix teaches us about escapism. [Re: d]
Scott Fraser Offline
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Registered: 03/20/05
Posts: 5231
Loc: Los Angeles
#9!
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#2954132 - 10/22/18 06:44 PM Re: What Jimi Hendrix teaches us about escapism. [Re: whitefang]
desertbluesman Offline
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Registered: 05/22/07
Posts: 4770
Loc: Near Phoenix Az
Originally Posted By: whitefang
I've said it before DBM---

I've seen Hendrix live three times, and NONE of the footage of him in concert that I've seen in other medium (movies, TV, etc.) ever sounded as good as he did when I was THERE to HEAR it!

"Tortured artist"? Aren't MOST of them to some degree? But near as I can hear, none of that really showed up in most of his songs' lyrics that I can tell. Mostly a huge nod to one of his heroes, BOB DYLAN as in Jimi's penchant for word play and writing vivid visual images. And of course, many of the fine blues artists that preceded him. Listen closely and you can hear many well worn blues runs given new life by him just placing a slightly different emphasis on some of the notes.

Oh, and DBM---

I remember reading an interview with Jimi in which HE TOO considered Eric Clapton one of HIS "heroes". Thought you'd get a kick out of that.
Whitefang


It took me a little while after first hearing Hendrix to really appreciate his work. But once I did understand what he did and how he did it, I became a huge admirer. I knew about him from almost day one of his Are You Experienced album. My then brother in law and I went to Atlantic City to buy records. That was one 40 mile trek each way, so it only happened a few times here and there. On that day I bought Sgt Pepper, maybe some other albums and the Are You Experienced album. I never even thought or heard about him before that day. My then brother in law picked up the album and said look at the hair on this n***r which was a common word used back then (and the hair was the reason we both bought the album because of that freak value). (We lived in an all white community with only a few African descended folks living off the island but went to the same school) Anyways we had a 8 track player in my car and I bought the Sgt Pepper in 8 track and Lp so we could play that tape on the way home. Of course we were stunned by the Sgt Pepper album on the way home. Especially when A Day In The Life came on.

Later on when we got home, we listened to all the albums we had bought that day. I thought Hendrix was interesting, but no big deal to me at that time. It took me a while to get used to the melodic sense, and the composition of the Hendrix work, but still he was nothing special until I saw him do the Star Spangled Banner thing in the Woodstock movie. I of course had most of his albums by then but I was not a real fan until later on.

I came from being a fan of a-Capella and Motown to rock the night I heard the Crossroads tune by the Cream, and it took me a little while to grok the essence of Hendrix and his work. But once I finally did "get" his efforts I became a huge admirer, but that took years......
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#2954166 - 10/23/18 04:18 AM Re: What Jimi Hendrix teaches us about escapism. [Re: desertbluesman]
whitefang Offline
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Registered: 05/13/02
Posts: 11102
Loc: Lincoln Park, MI, UNITED STATE...
Ya gotta too remember...

To most of us back then WHAT he did and THAT he did it were more important to us than any academic analysis. That came later. But too, I sincerely doubt Hendrix himself thought of what he did in any of the previous mentioned terms. He heard something in his head and prevailed on others to help him achieve it.

I'd make a comparison to a couple of others who did sort of the same thing in another medium. For instance....

Everyone talks about how great the movie CITIZEN KANE is, but realize...

Much of what you SEE in the movie wasn't done in Hollywood (or anywhere else) at the time. And ORSON WELLES Wouldn't have achieved his "vision" if not for the collaborative efforts of cinematographer GREGG TOLAND, like I think a lot of what Hendrix achieved (sonically and on record) was helped a lot by engineer EDDIE KRAMER.

We not only liked the MUSIC and EFFECTS Jimi put out, but the PLAY with the stereo signal was a trip too. With just TWO CHANNELS to work with there were a few tunes that had an effect he was using sound as if it was CIRCLING THE ROOM! And this BEFORE the advent of the over hyped center speaker. wink
Whitefang
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#2954212 - 10/23/18 08:35 AM Re: What Jimi Hendrix teaches us about escapism. [Re: d]
GregC Offline
MP Hall of Fame Member

Registered: 10/26/03
Posts: 5791
Loc: Discovery Bay, California
Originally Posted By: d
This is where I disagree w/many abt JH.
He was so much more than a great guitarist.
As GregC mentioned earlier, he was really a groundbreaking composer whose work went far beyond thoughtful lyrics or interesting gtr playing.

Much as what Lennon-McC did w/G Martin, he actually did things both re:music theory & in compositional form that had no real precedent, at least in pop music...or in any of the music he drew from.

His consistent use of dom 7b9 chords is preshaded by stuff like Scriabin's "mystic chord" but we can be fairly sure that, unlike say Zappa, Jimim never listened to much classical music.
Even more striking to me is stuff like his recasting of Bob the Dyl's "Watch Yer Tower". grin
Or what abt this tune?

All the gtr FX are striking & significant to the composition but strip it down tho just it's basics of chord progression & all the extra beats/ritards & actually cosider where that stuff came from.
Who else was doing anything like that on a purely musical level ?

- Jimi 'heard ' musical ideas in his head . Call it a concept or a stem he kept on building from. Jimi had an out of this world Muse for song creation. He visualized and his fingers, skill and creativity caught fire/took over.



Or this one...where's he draw that shift to the #V for the refrain ?!
- are you Exp'd. Pretty sure this is a Jimi song about drug experimentation.
I think he may have borrowed some backward Fx ideas from the Beatles.

Some bg info but no real explanation...

- my opinion above


Special bonus clips just for kicks !
Xperienced / Hey Joe / Wild Thang
[video:youtube]https://www.youtube.c=xzCyTz_3TIU[/video]

- Doing 'covers' of classic rock songs. I think 60's musicians
may have taken a clue from Jimi

This one's a bit better recorded
Stone Free / P Haze / Hey Jude facepalm


- Stone free is 1 of my all time favorites. Jimi had an excellent voice.
Good recording !

At risk of too much of a G Thang
1 more but you can get the best value by dialing up the 9:00 min mark & listening to the verbal & instrumental intro to the last tune
[video:youtube]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fSJ6w[/video]

- Yeah, I went to 9:00. Jimi had a strong social conscience. Anti war and the Nam war
was a total FUBAR- F'd up lots of lives.
The social consciousness of the 60's also effected me. I have done original songs with a Martin Luther King speech/narrative. I also did my own cover of Marvin Gayes "whats going on '.
When I discuss social consciousness in music with my 30 something/Millenial neighbors, they look at me like I am a nutty old man wink



I enjoyed those clips, thanks ! I like to analyze songs, as a song writer. Not the 'technical' especially but the muse or driving inspiration of the Song.

I buried a few remarks here and there with a -
Embedded above.

Many of my original songs birthed out of frustration, disenchantment, etc. Writing/recording a song is often cathartic.


Edited by GregC (10/23/18 08:37 AM)
_________________________
Innovation is never a single event. It is a long process of discovery, engineering, and transformation.
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#2954240 - 10/23/18 10:33 AM Re: What Jimi Hendrix teaches us about escapism. [Re: desertbluesman]
Scott Fraser Offline
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Registered: 03/20/05
Posts: 5231
Loc: Los Angeles
Originally Posted By: desertbluesman
It took me a little while after first hearing Hendrix to really appreciate his work.


It took me exactly one spin of Purple Haze to know music had entered a new era. By the time the record got to Manic Depression I felt as if a tsunami had swept over me. I guess I was really ready for the phenomenon of Hendrix. I was all in instantly.
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#2954295 - 10/23/18 03:47 PM Re: What Jimi Hendrix teaches us about escapism. [Re: Scott Fraser]
d Offline
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Registered: 03/20/01
Posts: 7043
Loc: no longer lexington, Kenfunky,...
Veering a bit away from the actual thread point....
Originally Posted By: Scott Fraser
Originally Posted By: desertbluesman
It took me a little while after first hearing Hendrix to really appreciate his work.


It took me exactly one spin of Purple Haze to know music had entered a new era. By the time the record got to Manic Depression I felt as if a tsunami had swept over me. I guess I was really ready for the phenomenon of Hendrix. I was all in instantly.


I can recall the exact time of day & place, the lighting in the room, etc, when I 1st heard P Haze on the radio as a young teen.
& it didn't even take the entire track.

The 2nd note (that b5 of the 1-b5-1 riff) jolted me alert.
At the time I didn't know what I'd heard but I knew I'd never heard it in a pop song.
It was like being in a room where someone was flipping the light switch on & off.

As far as the idea that JH didn't quite know what he was doing musically, that's true but only in the sense of technical nomenclature.
He definitely knew what he was doing on a sonic level.
By the time he made his own records starting in 1966, he'd been playing for a decade & over 1/2 that time as a pro touring musician w/ some significant bands, as well as been in playing situations w/some of the strongest R&B players going in those days.
In terms of the "10,000 hours" expert rule, that was way back in the rearview !

He heard & knew the exact effect of what he was playing & how unique it was---& to a great degree remains today.

BTW...Scott, whats this mean ?
Originally Posted By: Scott Fraser
#9!


Greg, I'll be back soon w/ some further reference material in regard the thread's intended focus.
I've come across a trove of JH comments, interviews, etc, that are quite interesting.
See y'a back here soon !
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#2954307 - 10/23/18 05:22 PM Re: What Jimi Hendrix teaches us about escapism. [Re: d]
Scott Fraser Offline
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Registered: 03/20/05
Posts: 5231
Loc: Los Angeles
Originally Posted By: d
BTW...Scott, whats this mean ?
Originally Posted By: Scott Fraser
#9!



It's a sharp ninth, the "Hendrix chord" as we called it before we got schooled. You wrote b9.
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#2954309 - 10/23/18 05:41 PM Re: What Jimi Hendrix teaches us about escapism. [Re: d]
GregC Offline
MP Hall of Fame Member

Registered: 10/26/03
Posts: 5791
Loc: Discovery Bay, California
Originally Posted By: d
V

The 2nd note (that b5 of the 1-b5-1 riff) jolted me alert.
At the time I didn't know what I'd heard but I knew I'd never heard it in a pop song.
It was like being in a room where someone was flipping the light switch on & off.

As far as the idea that JH didn't quite know what he was doing musically, that's true but only in the sense of technical nomenclature.
He definitely knew what he was doing on a sonic level.

By the time he made his own records starting in 1966, he'd been playing for a decade & over 1/2 that time as a pro touring musician w/ some significant bands, as well as been in playing situations w/some of the strongest R&B players going in those days.
In terms of the "10,000 hours" expert rule, that was way back in the rearview !

He heard & knew the exact effect of what he was playing & how unique it was---& to a great degree remains today.

BTW...Scott, whats this mean ?
Originally Posted By: Scott Fraser
#9!


Greg, I'll be back soon w/ some further reference material in regard the thread's intended focus.
I've come across a trove of JH comments, interviews, etc, that are quite interesting.
See y'a back here soon !


That sounds good, brother. Look foreword to that.

Did you see the AXS presentation on Hendrix ? AXS is a premium cable channel.

They did an excellent job- you might find it, or parts of it on YouTube.

What I enjoy about Hendrix is studying his unique phrasing, chords, song construction.

I vaguely recall Albert King and Buddy Guy influenced his style.

The more I understand and dig into Jimi, it will slowly absorb into my song work.
I know this sounds weird coming from a keys guy. I like striking/strange chords.

I have an original named ' Nuclear Moon ' where I mix up/harmonize different chords as a backing to the 'lead ' part.
_________________________
Innovation is never a single event. It is a long process of discovery, engineering, and transformation.
My Soundcloud with many originals:
https://soundcloud.com/user-898236994

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#2954345 - 10/24/18 04:17 AM Re: What Jimi Hendrix teaches us about escapism. [Re: GregC]
whitefang Offline
10k Club

Registered: 05/13/02
Posts: 11102
Loc: Lincoln Park, MI, UNITED STATE...
Funny GREG, that you should mention BUDDY GUY....

I do seem to recall a story about how Jimi was "missing" 'bout a half hour before he was due on stage at a concert in Chicago. About a dozen or so guys (handlers, roadies, etc.) took off looking for him. He was found about two or three blocks from the venue in a small club watching and listening to Buddy Guy! roll
Whitefang
_________________________
I started out with NOTHING...and I still have most of it left!

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#2954363 - 10/24/18 06:48 AM Re: What Jimi Hendrix teaches us about escapism. [Re: whitefang]
GregC Offline
MP Hall of Fame Member

Registered: 10/26/03
Posts: 5791
Loc: Discovery Bay, California
Originally Posted By: whitefang
Funny GREG, that you should mention BUDDY GUY....

I do seem to recall a story about how Jimi was "missing" 'bout a half hour before he was due on stage at a concert in Chicago. About a dozen or so guys (handlers, roadies, etc.) took off looking for him. He was found about two or three blocks from the venue in a small club watching and listening to Buddy Guy! roll
Whitefang


Back then, Chicago was an important stop for Eric, Jimi and other great guitarists. They
had a chance to see legendary blues guitarists. ( I grew up in Chicago, a heavily segregated city].

The AXS show about Jimi, discussed how his manager/tour promoter, moved him back and forth over the country, LA to Chicago to NY to Denver, etc etc. Jimi had little
down time since he was in a new city every day.
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#2954477 - 10/25/18 04:32 AM Re: What Jimi Hendrix teaches us about escapism. [Re: GregC]
whitefang Offline
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That manager would be CHAS CHANDLER, former bassist for THE ANIMALS, without whom there probably might NOT have been a JIMI HENDRIX.

It was Chas after all, who spotted and heard Jimi( performing under the name "Jimmy James" ) in Greenwich Village's legendary CAFE "WHA?" and took him to England and helped put together The Experience and produced the first two LPs.
Whitefang
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#2954487 - 10/25/18 06:40 AM Re: What Jimi Hendrix teaches us about escapism. [Re: whitefang]
GregC Offline
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Originally Posted By: whitefang
Ya gotta too remember...

To most of us back then WHAT he did and THAT he did it were more important to us than any academic analysis. That came later. But too, I sincerely doubt Hendrix himself thought of what he did in any of the previous mentioned terms. He heard something in his head and prevailed on others to help him achieve it.


Whitefang


a solid point, Wf


to continue, Jimi had a wide supporting cast, many musicians behind the scenes
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#2954490 - 10/25/18 06:45 AM Re: What Jimi Hendrix teaches us about escapism. [Re: whitefang]
GregC Offline
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Originally Posted By: whitefang
That manager would be CHAS CHANDLER, former bassist for THE ANIMALS, without whom there probably might NOT have been a JIMI HENDRIX.

It was Chas after all, who spotted and heard Jimi( performing under the name "Jimmy James" ) in Greenwich Village's legendary CAFE "WHA?" and took him to England and helped put together The Experience and produced the first two LPs.
Whitefang


You are right, without Chas , maybe we would not have heard Jimi.

I can say this - promotion is a MuthaF%$%%$# bitc%$#

If Chas was still with us I would ask him to visit my SoundCloud wink
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#2954509 - 10/25/18 08:32 AM Re: What Jimi Hendrix teaches us about escapism. [Re: GregC]
d Offline
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Oh we'da heard from, although it may've been different.
Chandler did offer him a freedom & congeniality others may not've.
However, Hendrix was already becoming well-known in thew NYC area.
Cat's like John Hammond jr (son of legendary producer JH sr) & other locals knew of him, as well as all those English cats.
Les Paul's on record as having heard him &, stunned by what JH was doing in some small club, was on a mission to find him & get him a contract.

[BTW almost finishe dw/ the project I mentioned above]
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#2954542 - 10/25/18 12:20 PM Re: What Jimi Hendrix teaches us about escapism. [Re: d]
Delta Offline
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I received the Are You Experienced album on my 12th birthday. The world changed for both me and my parents on that first spin. Within a year I had an old beat up Harmony acoustic and was taking lessons.
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#2954555 - 10/25/18 01:38 PM Re: What Jimi Hendrix teaches us about escapism. [Re: Delta]
d Offline
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Uh, so how'd that affect yer Mom'n'Pops ?
grin snax
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#2954564 - 10/25/18 03:39 PM Re: What Jimi Hendrix teaches us about escapism. [Re: d]
Delta Offline
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Originally Posted By: d
Uh, so how'd that affect yer Mom'n'Pops ?
grin snax


Well d, let me put it this way. They couldn't have been more stunned had an alien space ship landed in our living room. No more cowboy songs.
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#2954631 - 10/26/18 04:54 AM Re: What Jimi Hendrix teaches us about escapism. [Re: Delta]
whitefang Offline
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grin
I'll bet if(when you got it) you cranked up the first track on AXIS: Bold As Love, they might HAVE thought an alien spaceship was landing in the living room! wink

I'd have posted the track if I could remember how.... blush
Whitefang
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#2954635 - 10/26/18 05:11 AM Re: What Jimi Hendrix teaches us about escapism. [Re: whitefang]
Eric Iverson Offline
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I have read that Jimi really took all that flying saucer stuff very seriously indeed.

At any rate, he left behind some great music, and expanded peoples' concepts of what could be done with an electric guitar and with rock music. A very creative mind.

Unfortunately, in the minds of many people, it was more about his IMAGE than his MUSIC, i.e., what he actually played and wrote. But I'm sure that's true of all "stars", LOL.

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#2954651 - 10/26/18 07:06 AM Re: What Jimi Hendrix teaches us about escapism. [Re: Eric Iverson]
GregC Offline
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Originally Posted By: Eric Iverson
I

Unfortunately, in the minds of many people, it was more about his IMAGE than his MUSIC, i.e., what he actually played and wrote. But I'm sure that's true of all "stars", LOL.


I doubt Jimi gaveashit about 'pleasing' everyone. He was a creative, flamboyant, and expressive artist.

If anybody wants to define Jimi as a more contrived image than a genuine artist, is totally missing the point. Some folks will never get it.
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#2954786 - 10/26/18 07:59 PM Re: What Jimi Hendrix teaches us about escapism. [Re: whitefang]
Delta Offline
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Originally Posted By: whitefang
grin
I'll bet if(when you got it) you cranked up the first track on AXIS: Bold As Love, they might HAVE thought an alien spaceship was landing in the living room! wink

I'd have posted the track if I could remember how.... blush
Whitefang


By the time I got the AXIS album I had my own stereo in the basement, which was good because the bar, pool table, a television and fireplace were all there. Excellent planning on my part.
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#2954806 - 10/27/18 04:35 AM Re: What Jimi Hendrix teaches us about escapism. [Re: Delta]
whitefang Offline
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ACK!

I didn't get my OWN stereo( and one worth listening to) until I was about 30 ('81, a BANG & OLEFSUN set-up) and then could finally hear all that great stuff in my old Hendrix LPs that I'd been missing out on all those years. wink My first couple of "sound systems" were cheap, ragged sounding things due to my money going to things like clothes, food and such for the baby, and saving for a down payment for a house..... wink

Whitefang
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#2954838 - 10/27/18 10:01 AM Re: What Jimi Hendrix teaches us about escapism. [Re: Scott Fraser]
d Offline
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Originally Posted By: Scott Fraser
Originally Posted By: d
BTW...Scott, whats this mean ?
Originally Posted By: Scott Fraser
#9!



It's a sharp ninth, the "Hendrix chord" as we called it before we got schooled. You wrote b9.

facepalm
Oh, man I should've seen that !

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#2954842 - 10/27/18 10:33 AM Re: What Jimi Hendrix teaches us about escapism. [Re: d]
Scott Fraser Offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted By: Scott Fraser
Originally Posted By: d
BTW...Scott, whats this mean ?
Originally Posted By: Scott Fraser
#9!



It's a sharp ninth, the "Hendrix chord" as we called it before we got schooled. You wrote b9.

facepalm
Oh, man I should've seen that !


D'oh!
In high school (before we knew any better) we alternatively called it the Hendrix chord or a Major/Minor chord, not knowing it was a well known staple of jazz harmony long before Hendrix got his hands on it.
I tried it as a b9. That's a pretty interesting color too, but would never have made Purple Haze & Foxy Lady the snarling, aggressive blows against pop mediocrity that they were. A variation I use a lot in free improv applications is the maj7#9 voicing. Much more unsettled & dissonant.
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#2954870 - 10/27/18 02:37 PM Re: What Jimi Hendrix teaches us about escapism. [Re: Scott Fraser]
d Offline
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Just on the face of it, many Hendrix tunes seek escape.









& THE MAN HIMSELF




Just finished 1st read-through of JIMI HENDRRIX, STARTING AT ZERO a 2013 compendium of quotes from JH collated by Alan Douglas, renown producer & associate of JH, along w/the lesser-known Brit documentary filmmaker Peter Neal who worked w/JH in the v. early days of his major career breakthrough in England.
The title of their book derives frrom a statement JH made in an early press release: "I was born in Seattle, USA, November 27, 1942 at the age of zero." roll

Here are some quotes they attribute to JH...
In school I liked poetry & painting scenes on other planets; Summer Afternoon on Venus, & like that.

My ambition ? To hit the blues scene on Venus.
My ambitions change 100 times everyday. You never know what shape the clouds will be til you see them.
Right now I'm saying goodbye to you & getting in a limo to the airport.
When I go out the door, this'll be over. & maybe I'll write a song abt it. Thanks.

I can't help isolating myself from the world; sometimes I just want to be left alone.

When I'm playing I'm on a rocketship---don't know where I'm going but you can come with me !
---------------------------------------
2 years after his early phenomenal success JH found himself in several traps.
Chandler, fed up w/what he considered endless doodling recording ELECTRIC LANDLADY grin had sold out to Mike Jeffery, leaving JH in the hands of a man considered quite avaricious.
JH also got caught in legal action by a small time NYC producer who sued over a flimsy but legal contract he'd signed while an impoverished club musician, costing his current record companies & his own operation considerable money at the same time he was planning to build a state of the art studio in NYC.
Most of 1969 was spent in a whirlwind of touring to pay for all that [at the time JH was prolly the highest paid entertainer in the world, getting $90K + per gig].
Then he got arrested spring of 1969 entering Canada & faced a v. serious trial.
Luckily he was acquitted but that wasn't til December of 69 & the stress must've been incredible through out the year.
Early 1970, at a major benefit concert at Mad Square Garden, he literally just collapsed onstage, ending the original Band of Gypsys.
Then a few months later, his oldest friend, bassist Billy Cox, got doed w/ drugs in Germany & had a mental breakdown.
JH had to send him home to his family while wondering what his caeer was actually doing to him & those around him.
He apparently started trying to re-engage Chas Chandler as mgr & dis-engage from Jeffry in the week before his death.
------------------------------------------
Some like to imagine that he developed a fatalistic attitude & maybe even intended his own demise.
I don't think so.

Here's some more from the book quoted above....

"My initial success was a step in the right direction but only a step.
I'd like to take a 6 month break & go to music school.
I want a big expansion, a big band to write for...to paint pictures of Earth & space, even greater than Holst's PLANETS.
When our last tour ended, I just wanted to go away & forget everything.
Then I started thing...thinking about the future...that the era of music kicked off by The Beatles has ended & something new has to come...& Jimi Hendrix will be there."

cool wave
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#2954951 - 10/28/18 04:44 AM Re: What Jimi Hendrix teaches us about escapism. [Re: d]
whitefang Offline
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Couldn't help but humorously think, when reading about all this "B9" stuff...

Well, based on ONE definition, music WAS pretty much getting benign until Jimi came along! laugh

And IMHO----

Trying to define what made him so "great" is like trying to analyze why CHOCOLATE tastes so good. Despite millions of people who just LOVE chocolate, I still know plenty of people who can't stand it. Figure THAT out, and there's your key into understanding why many people( though plenty of others didn't then and now) love/loved Jimi's music. wink And too.....

What became of all those FROGS in science class once you got through dissecting THEM? wink
Whitefang
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#2955137 - 10/29/18 07:42 AM Re: What Jimi Hendrix teaches us about escapism. [Re: d]
GregC Offline
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Originally Posted By: d
Just on the face of it, many Hendrix tunes seek escape.







I enjoyed this version of MD- that middle blues break is good stuff.

Excellent live recording of Freedom. These days, I appreciate good quality
recordings of Jimi Live.

Thanks !
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#2955265 - 10/29/18 03:48 PM Re: What Jimi Hendrix teaches us about escapism. [Re: GregC]
d Offline
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Not that much JH generally available on YT or other free sources.
His estate watches the (c) material v.closely so, as w/PRN, it's mostly covers or live stuff.
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#2955350 - 10/30/18 04:43 AM Re: What Jimi Hendrix teaches us about escapism. [Re: d]
whitefang Offline
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Yeah, his estate shoulda kept a closer eye out and avoided that suck-ass clip of "Manic Depression" you posted from being available. sick
All the other clips were pretty good. Enjoyed all that early '70's footage of Detroit in that Pretenders clip. wink
Whitefang
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#2955368 - 10/30/18 06:40 AM Re: What Jimi Hendrix teaches us about escapism. [Re: d]
GregC Offline
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Originally Posted By: d
Not that much JH generally available on YT or other free sources.
His estate watches the (c) material v.closely so, as w/PRN, it's mostly covers or live stuff.


I recall the legal fight over Jimi's estate. Here's more;
https://www.billboard.com/articles/columns/rock/6663933/jimi-hendrix-family-settles-estate-dispute

And that might explain the aggressive scrutiny on leaking material on YT.

Bowie's estate scrutinizes YT and other digital music sites. I did a 1 man band cover
of an obscure Bowie song and it got deleted in 1 minute. Disappeared like an ice
cube on a blast furnace.
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#2955375 - 10/30/18 07:31 AM Re: What Jimi Hendrix teaches us about escapism. [Re: whitefang]
GregC Offline
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Originally Posted By: whitefang

And IMHO----

Trying to define what made him so "great" is like trying to analyze why CHOCOLATE tastes so good. Despite millions of people who just LOVE chocolate, I still know plenty of people who can't stand it. Figure THAT out, and there's your key into understanding why many people( though plenty of others didn't then and now) love/loved Jimi's music. wink And too.....

Whitefang


Jimi was outrageous, innovative, engaging and creative. A long list of superlatives.

I think your post is getting to 'what ' is popular and ' why ' someone becomes popular
( which is a million dollar question].

To clarify, its not strictly 1 way or no way. There are degrees of popular . Jimi didn't require everyone aged 16 yrs old to 24 yrs( of music fans] old to follow him.

IOW, a musician or artist does not require an entire demographic to become 'popular'.
I think we all know this. Taking a stab- if a new artist captures 5% of the music listeners
in a demographic, its probably a big deal.

I don't believe its possible to please everyone. It seems impossible, anyway.
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#2955523 - 10/30/18 04:50 PM Re: What Jimi Hendrix teaches us about escapism. [Re: whitefang]
d Offline
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Originally Posted By: whitefang
Yeah, his estate shoulda kept a closer eye out and avoided that suck-ass clip of "Manic Depression" you posted from being available. sick


idk ?!
While I woulda preferred to stick w/a JH version, I thought that was OK...but they couldn't touch that anyway since it
[1] wasn't part of the JH rec catalog &
[2] they'd already signed off on it for that tribute project

Here's a few other options...uh, pick one... grin facepalm

A very, uh, clinical version


Rockier but sorta sloppy


Prog rock onslaught


Relatively unknown English woman whips my head around for a few moments then overstays her welcome


The most unlikely cover version


...that is until y'hear this


Mr Geoffrey Arnold Beck saves the day
triple play = Little Wing, Foxy Lady & Manic Depression
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