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#2926157 - 05/09/18 09:44 AM From a local blues guitarist
p90jr Offline
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Registered: 11/21/07
Posts: 3160
... with a Strat and a Stevie Ray hat

Guitarists, Why do Jazz players insist upon having the worst tone possible for the instrument? What is it that clicked in a jazz guitarist mind that said- "I must muffle and take all treble out of my guitar, else I'm not suitable" Of all the dynamic range of guitars, from single coil to hum buckers.. Why do they all insist upon the dullest tone imaginable? It's as if they all got together and created a club that established stupidity as coolness. Kinda like the common Moran that wears their pants down by their knees. The music they play, which was established by big horn bands, had an amazing amount of vibrancy inherent to horns, but yet, these fools married the exact opposite for their own instrument (of which was not readily accepted) Would one of you jazz guys please explain to me why I'm supposed to accept this pathetic tone as good in Gods great world?

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#2926161 - 05/09/18 10:11 AM Re: From a local blues guitarist [Re: p90jr]
Scott Fraser Offline
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Registered: 03/20/05
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Loc: Los Angeles
As has been said before, Jazz guitar is when you take a $5,000 instrument, plug it into a $200 amp, then turn all the treble off.
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#2926168 - 05/09/18 10:27 AM Re: From a local blues guitarist [Re: Scott Fraser]
Winston Psmith Offline
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Put flat wounds on a Guitar with Humbuckers, hard-wire the pickup switch to the neck pickup, plug into a Keyboard amp or a Polytone, and see what you get?

Part of the problem, I think, was a combined effort to eliminate string squeak and feedback, thus flat wound strings, and almost hi-fi sounding SS amps. Eventually, it came down to sacrificing any vestige of that elusive quality called "Tone".
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#2926215 - 05/09/18 01:22 PM Re: From a local blues guitarist [Re: Winston Psmith]
desertbluesman Offline
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Registered: 05/22/07
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I think it is mostly because of the trebles hurting the ears and the ice pick attack. Also hitting open notes, a lot of those guys also used to use a string dampener on the open strings to also keep unwanted noises from happening.
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#2926222 - 05/09/18 01:45 PM Re: From a local blues guitarist [Re: p90jr]
Fred_C Offline
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Registered: 06/12/10
Posts: 2121
Loc: PA
Originally Posted By: p90jr
... with a Strat and a Stevie Ray hat

Guitarists, Why do Jazz players insist upon having the worst tone possible for the instrument? What is it that clicked in a jazz guitarist mind that said- "I must muffle and take all treble out of my guitar, else I'm not suitable" Of all the dynamic range of guitars, from single coil to hum buckers.. Why do they all insist upon the dullest tone imaginable? It's as if they all got together and created a club that established stupidity as coolness. Kinda like the common Moran that wears their pants down by their knees. The music they play, which was established by big horn bands, had an amazing amount of vibrancy inherent to horns, but yet, these fools married the exact opposite for their own instrument (of which was not readily accepted) Would one of you jazz guys please explain to me why I'm supposed to accept this pathetic tone as good in Gods great world?


At first, I was not even going to acknowledge this thread with the common courtesy of a response. I do not appreciate being referred to as a "fool". He can kiss my senior citizen ass.

In addition to being an avid Jazz guitarist, I am also a rather highly skilled electric and acoustic Blues player. I can play his music, but I doubt that he can play mine. I am terribly offended by his comments.

Yes, we do tend to play the neck pickup exclusively. As a matter of fact, many Jazz guitars only have a neck pickup. We also roll back the tone on our instrument to create a warm, mellow, "burnished" tone. It is, to my way of thinking, a beautiful sound- sophisticated, elegant and timeless. Just like the music we play. One of the members on the JGF has a signature line that states, "The Jazz tone you seek is in your fingers".

If he is really interested, he should register on the JGF and ask his question there. I'm certain he would receive many, many interesting responses. There are innumerable threads on the JGF discussing this concept.

"Good" vs. "Bad" tone is highly subjective. Many Jazzcats do not roll their tone completely off, but rather find a "sweet spot" that they like.

By the way, the word is spelled M-O-R-O-N not "MORAN". Imbecile (spelled correctly)!!!

More on this thread when my anger subsides.
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#2926236 - 05/09/18 03:54 PM Re: From a local blues guitarist [Re: Fred_C]
d Offline
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Registered: 03/20/01
Posts: 6974
Loc: no longer lexington, Kenfunky,...
I don't think it would hurt to acknowledge the source of the OP's quote.
No one's likely to track'em down for debate.

More to the point, I think it's a question of tradition.
Early days of recording + sound reproduction tended to run toward a mid-range tone more from technology than intent.
Then over time the advances of sound reproduction + the tendency of blues & rock-oriented players to go for a rough, penetrating tone has left us w/an idea that anything less is too mild.
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#2926237 - 05/09/18 03:58 PM Re: From a local blues guitarist [Re: Fred_C]
p90jr Offline
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Registered: 11/21/07
Posts: 3160
Originally Posted By: Fred_C
Originally Posted By: p90jr
... with a Strat and a Stevie Ray hat

Guitarists, Why do Jazz players insist upon having the worst tone possible for the instrument? What is it that clicked in a jazz guitarist mind that said- "I must muffle and take all treble out of my guitar, else I'm not suitable" Of all the dynamic range of guitars, from single coil to hum buckers.. Why do they all insist upon the dullest tone imaginable? It's as if they all got together and created a club that established stupidity as coolness. Kinda like the common Moran that wears their pants down by their knees. The music they play, which was established by big horn bands, had an amazing amount of vibrancy inherent to horns, but yet, these fools married the exact opposite for their own instrument (of which was not readily accepted) Would one of you jazz guys please explain to me why I'm supposed to accept this pathetic tone as good in Gods great world?


At first, I was not even going to acknowledge this thread with the common courtesy of a response. I do not appreciate being referred to as a "fool". He can kiss my senior citizen ass.

In addition to being an avid Jazz guitarist, I am also a rather highly skilled electric and acoustic Blues player. I can play his music, but I doubt that he can play mine. I am terribly offended by his comments.

Yes, we do tend to play the neck pickup exclusively. As a matter of fact, many Jazz guitars only have a neck pickup. We also roll back the tone on our instrument to create a warm, mellow, "burnished" tone. It is, to my way of thinking, a beautiful sound- sophisticated, elegant and timeless. Just like the music we play. One of the members on the JGF has a signature line that states, "The Jazz tone you seek is in your fingers".

If he is really interested, he should register on the JGF and ask his question there. I'm certain he would receive many, many interesting responses. There are innumerable threads on the JGF discussing this concept.

"Good" vs. "Bad" tone is highly subjective. Many Jazzcats do not roll their tone completely off, but rather find a "sweet spot" that they like.

By the way, the word is spelled M-O-R-O-N not "MORAN". Imbecile (spelled correctly)!!!

More on this thread when my anger subsides.


My thoughts are the same as yours. "Moran" is a common local misspelling, here... which also is a common local name, here.

If I never have to hear another white guy with a Strat play SRV riffs again as long as I live, I'll be happy... give me the worst jazz tone in existence and I'd rather hear that... so my reaction was "how dare you..."

Kinda like the common Moran that wears their pants down by their knees.

Also, note the racist reference here... from a guy who plays blues.

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#2926239 - 05/09/18 04:03 PM Re: From a local blues guitarist [Re: p90jr]
p90jr Offline
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Registered: 11/21/07
Posts: 3160
You can't play jazz voicings with much of an overdriven or saturated sound without clashing overtones. I prefer those kind of voicings rather than power chords most of the time, and I tend to play cleaner than most rock guitarists I'm around... and some of them make comments about "your sound is too clean..." or "you can hear too many strings when play a chord"...

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#2926251 - 05/09/18 05:13 PM Re: From a local blues guitarist [Re: p90jr]
d Offline
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Registered: 03/20/01
Posts: 6974
Loc: no longer lexington, Kenfunky,...
Originally Posted By: p90jr
Also, note the racist reference here... from a guy who plays blues.

Is this the same cat you brought up last year ?
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#2926289 - 05/09/18 10:30 PM Re: From a local blues guitarist [Re: d]
Larryz Online   content
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Posts: 11411
Loc: Northern California
+1, I'm with you Brother Fred...and I know you're not a big fan of flat wounds. I've used them for quite awhile (i.e. a long time) as I like the feel and the silent clean squeak free sound. They are a bit dull but that thumpy bass sound lends itself to little jazz runs and I can imagine a bass player backing me up when I used them...I love the mellow jazz tones and players. One of my favorites is Joe Pass (that we both love). I went back to regular wound strings and put up with a little squeak because I like having my bright bass sound back for my country rock, rock and roll, rockabilly, etc.

Speaking of rock and roll I bought a couple of re-issues of the 62 Jaguar and a matching Jazzmaster. They came with original tweed cases, original leather straps, original guitar cord, pickups, switches, pickguards, etc., etc., as close as Fender could re-create right down to the magnets and pickup windings. Guess what they came loaded with? Yep, Flatwounds! They were there in the early 60's as a go to rock and roll string set of 10's. Everyone takes them off now days as guitars do sound better with round wounds. But, that depends on who is playing them as those great sounds come from those great artists' fingers. And though the Jazzmaster had the jazzers in mind when Fender put them out, they never caught on with the jazz guys (except for Joe Pass who used one starting out before going to Gibson). They were mainly used along with the Jag for rock and roll and surf bands like the Beach Boys and the Ventures. The Jag was specially made with a short scale by Fender for those fast rock and roll runs and leads but the Jazzmaster still hung in there due to their great sound (especially through Fender tube amps). Many 50's and 60's rock and rollers used flatwounds on both Gibsons, Fenders and other classic electrics. They are part of rock and roll history (not just for jazz players)...

So let them have their fun Brother Fred. You and I both know who the greats are no matter which strings or mellow tones they used. I prefer a clean guitar by those that know how to play one over an over-driven loud kid blasting away at a GC trying to sound like all the others. Many couldn't play blues on an acoustic if you gave them best axe on the block...oh well, that's my 2 cents. Each of us have our favorites and mine include players like you and the sounds we get from all of our genres. cool


Edited by Larryz (05/09/18 10:58 PM)
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#2926294 - 05/09/18 11:10 PM Re: From a local blues guitarist [Re: Larryz]
Larryz Online   content
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Loc: Northern California
+1 P90, I get where you're coming from regarding the clean player thing. In my country rock band it was the way to go so I was never asked to get down and dirty. Later, in my rock band days, the guys always wanted dirt and teased me about being Larry the Lounge Lizard! I could give it to them now and then when I was packing my pedals, but I still liked/like my clean sound the best and usually just go straight in... cool
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#2926299 - 05/10/18 02:17 AM Re: From a local blues guitarist [Re: Fred_C]
Caevan O'Shite Offline
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Originally Posted By: Fred_C
I can play his music, but I doubt that he can play mine.


Indeed! cool thu

Originally Posted By: Fred_C
Yes, we do tend to play the neck pickup exclusively. As a matter of fact, many Jazz guitars only have a neck pickup. We also roll back the tone on our instrument to create a warm, mellow, "burnished" tone. It is, to my way of thinking, a beautiful sound- sophisticated, elegant and timeless. Just like the music we play. One of the members on the JGF has a signature line that states, "The Jazz tone you seek is in your fingers".


Excellent points. MUCH agreed.

Originally Posted By: Fred_C
"Good" vs. "Bad" tone is highly subjective. Many Jazzcats do not roll their tone completely off, but rather find a "sweet spot" that they like.


I tend to think of good examples of the traditional dark Jazz Guitar tones as a big, rich, dark-chocolate, chonkin' tone, full and robust, ripe with harmonic-overtones and subtle shadings. A beautiful full-bodied sustain tends to be evident.

What I decidedly do not like in some examples of "Jazz Tone" is rubbery, plastic-y chorus-pedal abuse, ruining what otherwise might have been good tone from good players.

Once playing fingerstyle on a Gibson ES-165 "Herb Ellis" signature-model (this one with a PAF-style humbucker and metal T-o-M bridge on a wooden base), Tone control rolled-back to just such a "sweet spot", with hefty-gauge Thomastik-Infeld 'Swing Flatwounds' through a "blackface" Deluxe, Pro, or Twin Reverb... was a Heavenly experience. love I went back to buy that axe, and found that someone had beat me to it! Alas! frown

Originally Posted By: Fred_C
More on this thread when my anger subsides.

Better yet- create a tune, and/or improvise a solo, in response to it, and your thoughts and feelings here. Maybe call it, "The Matter At Hand", if you will.

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#2926306 - 05/10/18 03:48 AM Re: From a local blues guitarist [Re: Larryz]
whitefang Offline
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Registered: 05/13/02
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Loc: Lincoln Park, MI, UNITED STATE...
Fact is, for me at least, is that I've heard jazz played with a wider variety of different tones, not just the one the OP opines on. Depends on the piece being played too. Not ALL jazz is(what one guy I know called it) "sleepy time" dirges, but most "traditional" or "straight-up" jazz guitar does utilize more subdued tones, but not always the same tone for ALL the numbers played.

Now, I DO feel that everybody is entitled to their own opinion, but as long as they realize THEIR opinion isn't quintessential, but maybe just theirs and theirs alone, I'm OK with it. Even if I don't agree with it.
Whitefang
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#2926316 - 05/10/18 05:29 AM Re: From a local blues guitarist [Re: whitefang]
Fred_C Offline
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Registered: 06/12/10
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Loc: PA
@Whitefang:

Agreed. There is more than one "Jazz Tone" and it would be a function of the music being played.

Since I derive great pleasure from playing "Standards" in Chord Melody style, my subdued tone reflects the genre being played. If I were playing more modern stuff, I would undoubtedly chose a tone with more treble energy.
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#2926318 - 05/10/18 05:39 AM Re: From a local blues guitarist [Re: Larryz]
Fred_C Offline
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Registered: 06/12/10
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Bro. Larry,

Agreed. I can tolerate a "little squeak" in exchange for better definition and increased sustain.

It should probably be noted that the majority of players on the JGF play flatwounds. As you observed, I don't care for them. I have been playing "pure nickel" strings for a few years now. I get some of the mellowness (is that a word?) attributed to flatwounds with the increased definition of round wounds.
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#2926321 - 05/10/18 05:46 AM Re: From a local blues guitarist [Re: Caevan O'Shite]
Fred_C Offline
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Registered: 06/12/10
Posts: 2121
Loc: PA
I concur with your excellent and supportive comments.

I should mention that my second Jazz teacher advised me to avoid using chorus on chords. My tone is clean with a touch of reverb.

"I tend to think of good examples of the traditional dark Jazz Guitar tones as a big, rich, dark-chocolate, chonkin' tone, full and robust, ripe with harmonic-overtones and subtle shadings. A beautiful full-bodied sustain tends to be evident."


I really like the image that the above sentence conjures up.

Right on, brother man!
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#2926322 - 05/10/18 05:53 AM Re: From a local blues guitarist [Re: Scott Fraser]
Fred_C Offline
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Loc: PA
Originally Posted By: Scott Fraser
As has been said before, Jazz guitar is when you take a $5,000 instrument, plug it into a $200 amp, then turn all the treble off.


Funny!
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#2926323 - 05/10/18 06:01 AM Re: From a local blues guitarist [Re: Fred_C]
Fred_C Offline
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BTW: If my comment regarding being a "highly skilled electric and acoustic Blues guitarist" sounded arrogant and/or egotistical, I apologize. But, I invested years of study and thousands of hours of practice to acquire those skills and feel that I have a right to be proud of my accomplishments. In addition, I am forever in debt to the efforts of my Blues teacher, Philadelphia Jerry Ricks (RIP) as well as the efforts of my first Jazz teacher, Gregg Wright to put more polish on my Blues chops.
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#2926324 - 05/10/18 06:10 AM Re: From a local blues guitarist [Re: Fred_C]
Winston Psmith Offline
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Glad to see that Fred C. has rejoined the conversation.

My first thought, in reading the OP was, "Consider the source." Guy sounds like a wanna-be at best, a racist jackass at worst, so his opinion carries about as much weight as a Thin Guitar pick.

I've heard the tone he's describing, and I attribute it to laziness on the part of the person playing, not a general movement among Jazz Guitarists to abandon Tone & Volume. It's a misimpression of what Jazz Guitar should sound like, somewhere along this guy's misimpression of what a Blues Musician is. (A fool in a hat that's a cross between Gene Autry and Indiana Jones, playing a Guitar designed for someone else, while dismissing Music he can't play: real Bluesmen are shaking their heads.)

Sonny Sharrock was a Jazz Musician, and his sound could tear your head off. McLaughlin is a Jazz Musician, and you could drive nails with the SPL's coming off the stage at a Mahavisnu concert. Jazz is not the sound of a Guitar smothered in bubble wrap.

@Larryz - I'm with you on the Pure Nickel strings, however, I do use flats on my Epi DOT, and like them very much. I also like using flats on my Synth Access Guitar.

@P90jr - I recall Pete Townshend writing about what happens when you try to play a simple chord like a 1st Position C Major with Distortion, and how the overtones turn it into some Frankenchord. Even worse with complex Jazz chords: you might as well just hit the Guitar with a big stick.

@Fred C. - I think Chorus is one of the major offenders, in terms of this alleged wimpy Jazz tone. Few effects will gut your tone the way that Chorus can. Let the notes stand out, or why bother to play them?


Edit note: After some thought, I took out the word 'redneck' and replaced it with 'fool'. I've known plenty of good folks who would proudly identify themselves as "rednecks", but are neither fools, nor racists. They don't deserve to be linked with the guy who made those comments.


Edited by Winston Psmith (05/10/18 12:52 PM)
Edit Reason: inappropriate use of words
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#2926343 - 05/10/18 07:14 AM Re: From a local blues guitarist [Re: Winston Psmith]
DocPate Offline
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Registered: 01/11/16
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Loc: Virginia
I can't add much to these comments other than to tell what Chet Atkins said one time when we were chatting backstage at the Ryman..."...there's a time and place for every tone a guitar picker can think of, Grady [Martin] proved that on Marty's recording of Don't Worry.

By the way, both Chet and his brother Jim were great Jazz guitarists.

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#2926352 - 05/10/18 07:38 AM Re: From a local blues guitarist [Re: DocPate]
Larryz Online   content
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Registered: 06/23/08
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Loc: Northern California
Here's a little jazzy PBS concert taping I attended while sitting in the second row in this video:



these guys obviously like that single pickup style and jazz is not all mellow tone, flatwounds and dirge...it can be as lively as Django and Grappelli style...
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#2926384 - 05/10/18 10:04 AM Re: From a local blues guitarist [Re: Fred_C]
Scott Fraser Offline
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Registered: 03/20/05
Posts: 5219
Loc: Los Angeles
Originally Posted By: Fred_C
Bro. Larry,
Agreed. I can tolerate a "little squeak" in exchange for better definition and increased sustain.
It should probably be noted that the majority of players on the JGF play flatwounds. As you observed, I don't care for them. I have been playing "pure nickel" strings for a few years now. I get some of the mellowness (is that a word?) attributed to flatwounds with the increased definition of round wounds.


Several of my archtops came with flatwounds. I really dislike them. The attack is woolly & thunky, the sustain much too short, & they lack brilliance. They feel great, but I can't hang with the sound. I hear many great jazz players getting wonderful tone out of them, but I'm not that guy. I need more sustain to fill the space between notes. Also a lot of jazz guys put their extensions in the upper strings & concentrate on 3 or 4 string voicings. I do a lot of open strings & more full 5 & 6 string voicings, where stuff can get muddy & lost with duller strings. I also love the pure nickel strings, & again thank Caevan for the tip in that direction.
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#2926386 - 05/10/18 10:07 AM Re: From a local blues guitarist [Re: Fred_C]
Scott Fraser Offline
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Registered: 03/20/05
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Originally Posted By: Fred_C
Originally Posted By: Scott Fraser
As has been said before, Jazz guitar is when you take a $5,000 instrument, plug it into a $200 amp, then turn all the treble off.


Funny!


I'm pretty sure I read that in Downbeat magazine, or Jazz Times, so it wasn't coming from a detractor to the genre, like the original comment from the Blues guy.
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#2926388 - 05/10/18 10:18 AM Re: From a local blues guitarist [Re: Winston Psmith]
Scott Fraser Offline
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Registered: 03/20/05
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Loc: Los Angeles
Originally Posted By: Winston Psmith
Sonny Sharrock was a Jazz Musician, and his sound could tear your head off.


I was going to mention Sharrock, as an example of jazz tone which is very much NOT that rolled-off dark neck humbucker thing. Larry Coryell, also on the Memphis Underground album with Sharrock, had a similar, raw & harsh overdrive tone. John Scofield's overdriven tone is pretty non-mellow. There are plenty of jazz guys who stray fairly far away from the Herb Ellis, Kenny Burrell velvety kind of thing. Julian Lage is a young player who mostly plays a Tele. Lenny Breau & Ted Greene were also Tele players. The river is wide.
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#2926490 - 05/10/18 10:16 PM Re: From a local blues guitarist [Re: Scott Fraser]
Caevan O'Shite Offline
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Posts: 24808
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Originally Posted By: Scott Fraser
Originally Posted By: Winston Psmith
Sonny Sharrock was a Jazz Musician, and his sound could tear your head off.


I was going to mention Sharrock, as an example of jazz tone which is very much NOT that rolled-off dark neck humbucker thing. Larry Coryell, also on the Memphis Underground album with Sharrock, had a similar, raw & harsh overdrive tone. John Scofield's overdriven tone is pretty non-mellow. There are plenty of jazz guys who stray fairly far away from the Herb Ellis, Kenny Burrell velvety kind of thing. Julian Lage is a young player who mostly plays a Tele. Lenny Breau & Ted Greene were also Tele players. The river is wide.


The river is wide.
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#2926501 - 05/11/18 04:27 AM Re: From a local blues guitarist [Re: Caevan O'Shite]
Eric Iverson Offline
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The river is wide, so pack your scuba gear.....

Seriously, some jazz guitarists, like Jim Hall and Wes, got a nice sound out of flat-tops - I don't know what kind of strings they used.

The sound I like is what I once told a former bandleader: "pretty with an edge to it."

As in, a nice mid-range but with a little bit of treble and (sometimes) a little bit of distortion and sustain. The way I found to get it is an Alvarez Yairi acoustic through a Fender Princeton with a Di Marzio pickup, being very careful to turn the TREBLE ALL THE WAY DOWN - otherwise it sounds really ratty.

It's an electric sound but still with some acoustic richness.

Works for me, and people tell me they like the sound I get.

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#2926503 - 05/11/18 04:32 AM Re: From a local blues guitarist [Re: Scott Fraser]
whitefang Offline
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Registered: 05/13/02
Posts: 11022
Loc: Lincoln Park, MI, UNITED STATE...
Originally Posted By: Scott Fraser
Originally Posted By: Winston Psmith
Sonny Sharrock was a Jazz Musician, and his sound could tear your head off.


I was going to mention Sharrock, as an example of jazz tone which is very much NOT that rolled-off dark neck humbucker thing. Larry Coryell, also on the Memphis Underground album with Sharrock, had a similar, raw & harsh overdrive tone. John Scofield's overdriven tone is pretty non-mellow. There are plenty of jazz guys who stray fairly far away from the Herb Ellis, Kenny Burrell velvety kind of thing. Julian Lage is a young player who mostly plays a Tele. Lenny Breau & Ted Greene were also Tele players. The river is wide.


I've also often mentioned Canadian ED BICKERT is known to use a Tele. AND often too, manages to elicit that Herb Ellis, Kenny Burrell "velvety kind of thing" from it. wink But I won't start THAT argument again....

A sad thing I see more and more of as time passes( and unfortunately) is an increase of people believing for some reason(s) that certain genres of music "have to" be be this or that and "have to" be PLAYED either one way or another, and also sadly believe these limitations to be sacrosanct. frown
Whitefang
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#2926510 - 05/11/18 05:59 AM Re: From a local blues guitarist [Re: Eric Iverson]
Caevan O'Shite Offline
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Registered: 04/05/02
Posts: 24808
Loc: The Great Spirit's Handprint o...
Originally Posted By: Eric Iverson
The river is wide, so pack your scuba gear.....

Seriously, some jazz guitarists, like Jim Hall and Wes, got a nice sound out of flat-tops - I don't know what kind of strings they used.

The sound I like is what I once told a former bandleader: "pretty with an edge to it."

As in, a nice mid-range but with a little bit of treble and (sometimes) a little bit of distortion and sustain. The way I found to get it is an Alvarez Yairi acoustic through a Fender Princeton with a Di Marzio pickup, being very careful to turn the TREBLE ALL THE WAY DOWN - otherwise it sounds really ratty.

It's an electric sound but still with some acoustic richness.

Works for me, and people tell me they like the sound I get.


I really liked the clean acoustic and 'plugged-in' tones that I got with a cedar-topped, burled-mahogany bodied Alvarez-Yairi strung with .014" - .059" phosphor-bronze round-wound acoustic strings; it was a rich, full tone that served Jazzy chord stuff very well.
_________________________
Ask yourself- What Would Ren and Stimpy Do?

~ Caevan James-Michael Miller-O'Shite ~
_ ___ _ Leprechaun, Esquire _ ___ _

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#2927219 - 05/15/18 05:36 PM Re: From a local blues guitarist [Re: Eric Iverson]
Fred_C Offline
MP Hall of Fame Member

Registered: 06/12/10
Posts: 2121
Loc: PA
Originally Posted By: Eric Iverson

Seriously, some jazz guitarists, like Jim Hall and Wes, got a nice sound out of flat-tops


@ Eric- Question: I am aware that Wes played a Gibson L-5 and Jim Hall played two D'Aquisto custom archtops. However, I was completely unaware that they played flat tops. Do you know of any videos of them playing flat tops?
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#2927316 - 05/16/18 08:33 AM Re: From a local blues guitarist [Re: Fred_C]
Eric Iverson Offline
MP Hall of Fame Member

Registered: 08/03/05
Posts: 5279
Loc: Jackson Heights, NY
I stand corrected, Fred, LOL. I meant "archtops" of course.

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