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#2912731 - 03/02/18 03:10 PM Re: Ultra light strings. [Re: Scott Fraser]
Caevan O'Shite Offline
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Originally Posted By: Scott Fraser
Originally Posted By: d
I think the actual origin of the 1/2 step lower thing is for easier matching the gtr to horns (Eb & Bb) in R&B combos.


Interesting notion. I always thought Hendrix did it to get a deeper, heavier texture, like the current metal guys who use baritones or play 7 strings. But, Hendrix did his dues paying in R & B bands on the Chitlin circuit, so he may possibly have picked it up there & then kept it because he liked the added low end thump.


Good call, both o' yez.
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#2912737 - 03/02/18 03:49 PM Re: Ultra light strings. [Re: Caevan O'Shite]
Larryz Offline
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Here's a question you guys can answer for me: On the light gauge strings 7 8 9 10 11 13 18 etc., in a set of stings, are they all the same material i.e. plain steel? The wrapped strings could be wrapped in different materials like stainless, nickel, bronze, etc. Are the plain strings in a set made of the same materials or are they all just plain steel? And, do they coat the plain strings in a coated set like Elixirs? Anyone? Anyone? Beuller? idk

P.s I have noticed a difference in some sets where they have a goldish finish hew...like Thomas-stik probably an alloy...
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#2912786 - 03/02/18 10:28 PM Re: Ultra light strings. [Re: Larryz]
Caevan O'Shite Offline
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Originally Posted By: Larryz
Here's a question you guys can answer for me: On the light gauge strings 7 8 9 10 11 13 18 etc., in a set of stings, are they all the same material i.e. plain steel? The wrapped strings could be wrapped in different materials like stainless, nickel, bronze, etc. Are the plain strings in a set made of the same materials or are they all just plain steel? And, do they coat the plain strings in a coated set like Elixirs? Anyone? Anyone? Beuller? idk

P.s I have noticed a difference in some sets where they have a goldish finish hew...like Thomas-stik probably an alloy...


Originally Posted By: Larryz
...are they all the same material i.e. plain steel?


Usually; probably. Almost always, unless otherwise stated by the brand.

Originally Posted By: Larryz
I have noticed a difference in some sets where they have a goldish finish hew...like Thomas-stik probably an alloy...


Funny you should mention that- I just ordered a couple sets of Thomastik-Infeld Jazz bebop 12's, a "round-wound Jazz string" double-wound on round-core wire, that also includes brass-plated plain treble-strings. This is to protect against corrosion, and allegedly make their tone "project" better and balance with the wound-basses. Word is that the brass-plating wears off in spots, particularly against the frets, and that this is also the same of more common tin-plated plain-strings, except that it's more visually noticeable with the brass-plated strings.

(Here's what their Bebop double-wound round-core round-wound Jazz strings look like, unwound:)

_________________________________

Originally Posted By: Larryz
And, do they coat the plain strings in a coated set like Elixirs? Anyone? Anyone? Beuller? idk


Some do, some don't, some use a different kind of coating material and process altogether; varies with the brand and type.
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#2912814 - 03/03/18 06:45 AM Re: Ultra light strings. [Re: Caevan O'Shite]
Larryz Offline
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Thanks for the info Caevan! You have confirmed what I suspected. I quit using Thomastik as they just got too expensive. The plain strings did have a gold hew and did seem to last as I think they keep the acid hands syndrome in check LOL! They are a great string company with great quality control. I was using their nickel wrapped flat wounds then went to D'Addario Chromes which are stainless steel wrapped. Then I quit using flat wounds and found some Helix wrapped nickel strings by Dean Markley that I like very well. Only problem is the plain strings in the set are too heavy of a gauge, so I order a cheap set with 10 13 17's plain strings for $4 bucks which is cheaper than buying singles...

I suspect that the stainless strings to include the plain strings in the stainless sets, may cause premature fret ware unless you have stainless frets...any thoughts on this? cool
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#2912820 - 03/03/18 07:09 AM Re: Ultra light strings. [Re: Scott Fraser]
d Offline
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Originally Posted By: Caevan O'Shite
Originally Posted By: Scott Fraser
Originally Posted By: d
I think the actual origin of the 1/2 step lower thing is for easier matching the gtr to horns (Eb & Bb) in R&B combos.


Interesting notion. I always thought Hendrix did it to get a deeper, heavier texture, like the current metal guys who use baritones or play 7 strings. But, Hendrix did his dues paying in R & B bands on the Chitlin circuit, so he may possibly have picked it up there & then kept it because he liked the added low end thump.


Good call, both o' yez.

Retuning to a lower pitch didn't originate w/ Jimi & in fact may not be restricted to R&B/rock styles.

When I switched to electric gtr in the late 1960s it was already common amoungst many I played with.
It was also common then for many garage bands not even to pay attention to standard pitch if there was no kb or other set pitch instrument involved.

I'd say if we were to investigate this there'd be a slew of players who've done this.
I reiterate that the actual effect on pitch is only 1 semitone so, while there is some shift in harmonic weight &/or pitch range, that effect is as minimal as it could be...hence the idea that key shifting is a more logical explanation.
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#2912827 - 03/03/18 08:10 AM Re: Ultra light strings. [Re: d]
Larryz Offline
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@ d et al, I have a chord book "Elvis Presley The King of Rock and Roll" which has many of his early songs with the tab and sheet music of Scotty Moore's leads and guitar work (and other newer tunes like Jerry Reed's Guitar Man D A D G B D 1967). There are several tunes where Scotty used drop tuning. He dropped a whole step to D tuning. For instance Don't Be Cruel tuning was D G C F A D...1956 and Wear My Ring Around Your Neck 1958 was D A D G B E.
and a half step to Eb Ab Db Gb Bb Eb for Jail House Rock 1957 and Too Much 1957.

Brian Setzer likes dropping the E string down to D. He also likes playing and singing in the key of Eb as well, so if you like his stuff and want to use open chords, you might also consider dropping a half step to Eb. I think SRV did it for his vocals as all of his stuff in any key is dropped a half step by using Eb tuning. But, it could also be for bending those heavy strings LOL! cool

ps. When started playing guitar around '63, I used to tune my guitar to the piano in our living room. Some guys used a tuning fork to get a string in tune and then tune the rest to it. We had those old pitch pipes that had a pipe for each string that they sold in guitar stores that we kept in our cases. Also, if one guy sounded more in tune than the rest, we would tune to him LOL! I have a buddy that still insists on tuning to his harmonica... crazy


Edited by Larryz (03/03/18 08:31 AM)
Edit Reason: ps.
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#2912887 - 03/03/18 01:50 PM Re: Ultra light strings. [Re: Larryz]
Winston Psmith Offline
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Originally Posted By: Larryz
I suspect that the stainless strings to include the plain strings in the stainless sets, may cause premature fret ware unless you have stainless frets...any thoughts on this? cool



@Larryz - I've heard some back-&-forth about stainless steel strings, and fret wear. The general opinion seems to be that they do cause more fret wear than plain nickel; I can't swear to this, myself, and I'm not sure that nickel plating makes much difference? FWIW, I used D'Addario EXL 110's for years, which are nickel-plated steel, then I switched to DR Tite-Fits, which are also nickel plated.

Currently, I use DR Pure Blues (pure nickel), .010-.046 on most of my Electric Guitars, with D'Addario Chromes, .010-.048, on my Epi Dot. Been very happy with the sound and feel in each case.
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#2912898 - 03/03/18 02:29 PM Re: Ultra light strings. [Re: Winston Psmith]
d Offline
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[1]
Larry's post just above adds to my belief that lowered tuning ( I deliberately avoid the use of the term "dropped" since it has connotations of altered tuning rather than simply lowered pitch overall) is neither new nor just in the realm of rock/R&B.

[2]
As far as the physical properties of diff materials, that's an important consideration in terms of stress on yer instrument &/or the functional life of the string but I'd suggest that we look beyond the comments of manufacturers, users, etc, in a field where endorsements often have nothing to do w/ what players really use when not tryna save money while touring, to what the demonstrable properties of the diff materials as evaluated by independent experts....if there even is such a category anymore.
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#2912904 - 03/03/18 03:13 PM Re: Ultra light strings. [Re: Larryz]
Caevan O'Shite Offline
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Originally Posted By: Larryz
...I suspect that the stainless strings to include the plain strings in the stainless sets, may cause premature fret ware unless you have stainless frets...any thoughts on this? cool


I think that just how hard one presses the strings down will have a lot to do with fret-wear, as well as stainless steel vs nickel-plated vs pure/solid-nickel vs silk-lined marshmallow... wink
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#2912949 - 03/03/18 08:45 PM Re: Ultra light strings. [Re: Caevan O'Shite]
Larryz Offline
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@ Winston, According to the Dean Markley package "pure nickel strings are easier on the frets and gentler to the touch." I guess the nickel plated ones cost less than pure nickel. I liked the D'Addario Chromes as they are stainless and the wound strings are brighter than the Thomastik nickel flat wounds and they cost half as much. The brighter the better when it comes to flat wounds. But, the fret wear of the stainless steel strings concept has always concerned me, even though it may or may not be true. I've read that it's pretty hard to cause wear on stainless steel frets but I've never tried them yet... cool

@ d, I think of "altered tuning" when you tune to a chord like A tuning, G tuning, etc. and change the tuning from standard. "Drop tuning" for me, is when you remain in standard tuning and drop all of the strings down. "Lowered tuning" may be a better way of describing it. I've heard many players (including Setzer) refer to "drop D" tuning where everything stays in standard but the E 6th string is dropped down to D. I don't know how far back in time these concepts go. +1 it was being used in rock and roll in the 50's and many of the old blues players used altered tunings long before the rock and roll boys came along... cool

@ Caevan, +1. I have noticed my fret wear occurs in many of the same places at the same string locations on different guitars! So it can be from the way we put pressure on the strings. I think it's mostly due to bending and playing in my favorite keys...and bending those favorite notes...if you look at some of the old guys acoustics (including my beginning days), we would wear out the fret board in the 1st 3 or 4 frets. You can see the C F and G gouges in the fret board from a distance LOL! When they have used the guitar for many years and just play in those open chord positions putting all the pressure in that location...the rest of the neck is like new. Much like the guys who seldom play above the 12th fret... cool
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#2912964 - 03/04/18 04:16 AM Re: Ultra light strings. [Re: Larryz]
whitefang Offline
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I imagine any steel string can contribute to some amount of fret wear. And of course the frequency and method of play. I don't know if any studies were done as to which string material causes the greater amount of wear on which particular fret material or not so it's probably a waste of time worrying about any of it.

and, "Tomayto, to-mah-to": What you call any particular method of tuning doesn't change what it basically is or make it better.(or the person any smarter). I suppose it IS safe to say that ANY tuning that differs from "standard" is "altered" tuning. That each "altered" tuning has it's OWN particular name is what might confuse the issue.

BTW: "Drop D" tuning is the first "Altered" and "alternate" tuning I've ever used. Figured out it was what a lot of old "folkies" were doing on many old folk tunes. wink DYLAN used it a lot.

The only flatwounds I ever used were FENDER strings that came out back in the late '60's and really didn't sound all that great. I wasn't aware some manufacturers still made 'em though, and I guess I can imagine they've improved some over the decades.
Whitefang
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#2912985 - 03/04/18 07:09 AM Re: Ultra light strings. [Re: whitefang]
Scott Fraser Offline
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Originally Posted By: whitefang
The only flatwounds I ever used were FENDER strings that came out back in the late '60's and really didn't sound all that great. I wasn't aware some manufacturers still made 'em though, and I guess I can imagine they've improved some over the decades.
Whitefang


They are still made & fairly common. A lot of jazz guys really like flatwounds. The Good: they pretty much totally eliminate string squeak when changing position. The Bad: I think they sound dull & thunky, & sustain far less than round wound strings.
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#2912992 - 03/04/18 08:03 AM Re: Ultra light strings. [Re: Scott Fraser]
skipclone 1 Online   content
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If I really want to, I can greatly reduce or eliminate string squeak when changing chords. But it`s exhausting, and an added burden if one is singing too. There`s no big secret, basically it`s a matter of changing positions more vertically than is common.
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#2913012 - 03/04/18 10:40 AM Re: Ultra light strings. [Re: Caevan O'Shite]
d Offline
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Originally Posted By: Caevan O'Shite
Originally Posted By: Larryz
...I suspect that the stainless strings to include the plain strings in the stainless sets, may cause premature fret ware unless you have stainless frets...any thoughts on this? cool


I think that just how hard one presses the strings down will have a lot to do with fret-wear, as well as stainless steel vs nickel-plated vs pure/solid-nickel vs silk-lined marshmallow... wink

Hmmmm....
Does the material of the fretboard know how hard or how intensely yer pressing ?
I don't think so.
The intensity of that press may have an effect over time but no more than the cumulative effect of repeated pressing any number of times over any time period.
[Seen ?]
There may be an effect of metal against metal & any alloys but how hard one presses is, I think, assigning a value that goes beyond whatever the material itself can "recognize" or effect.
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#2913014 - 03/04/18 10:47 AM Re: Ultra light strings. [Re: Larryz]
d Offline
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Originally Posted By: Larryz
@ d, I think of "altered tuning" when you tune to a chord like A tuning, G tuning, etc. and change the tuning from standard. "Drop tuning" for me, is when you remain in standard tuning and drop all of the strings down. "Lowered tuning" may be a better way of describing it. I've heard many players (including Setzer) refer to "drop D" tuning where everything stays in standard but the E 6th string is dropped down to D. I don't know how far back in time these concepts go. +1 it was being used in rock and roll in the 50's and many of the old blues players used altered tunings long before the rock and roll boys came along...

So ?
Yer attempted explanation only points up why I avoided that term in the 1st place.
There's a def diff between "dropped tuning" as a general term for altered tunings involving various strings & overall lowered pitch.
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#2913016 - 03/04/18 11:02 AM Re: Ultra light strings. [Re: Scott Fraser]
d Offline
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Originally Posted By: Scott Fraser
Quote:
The only flatwounds I ever used were FENDER strings that came out back in the late '60's and really didn't sound all that great. I wasn't aware some manufacturers still made 'em though, and I guess I can imagine they've improved some over the decades.


They are still made & fairly common. A lot of jazz guys really like flatwonds. The Good: they pretty much totally eliminate string squeak when changing position. The Bad: I think they sound dull & thunky, & sustain far less than round wound strings.

Relevant & accurate response but pointless b/c that cat in the 1st quote has no actual musical experience but only the desire to comment on whatever he can.
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#2913017 - 03/04/18 11:11 AM Re: Ultra light strings. [Re: skipclone 1]
d Offline
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Originally Posted By: skipclone 1
If I really want to, I can greatly reduce or eliminate string squeak when changing chords. But it`s exhausting, and an added burden if one is singing too. There`s no big secret, basically it`s a matter of changing positions more vertically than is common.

"Exhausting" ?
While I generally agree w/ Skip, who, like several here is a very active & skilled performer, I would suggest that the effort to alter that doesn't require more than the effort to alter any other aspect of playing.
Practice makes perfect.
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#2913038 - 03/04/18 02:30 PM Re: Ultra light strings. [Re: d]
Larryz Offline
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Originally Posted By: d
Originally Posted By: Larryz
@ d, I think of "altered tuning" when you tune to a chord like A tuning, G tuning, etc. and change the tuning from standard. "Drop tuning" for me, is when you remain in standard tuning and drop all of the strings down. "Lowered tuning" may be a better way of describing it. I've heard many players (including Setzer) refer to "drop D" tuning where everything stays in standard but the E 6th string is dropped down to D. I don't know how far back in time these concepts go. +1 it was being used in rock and roll in the 50's and many of the old blues players used altered tunings long before the rock and roll boys came along...

So ?
Yer attempted explanation only points up why I avoided that term in the 1st place.
There's a def diff between "dropped tuning" as a general term for altered tunings involving various strings & overall lowered pitch.


Basically we are saying the exact same thing. The difference in what most call altered tuning is that you tune to a chord...as in A tuning G tuning D tuning E tuning , etc. When doing drop tuning we are describing you lower the pitch of all 6 strings one half step from where they are tuned at 440 or to a piano in concert tuning. The difference is when doing altered tuning all of your intervals change for the most part, while doing drop tuning all of the intervals stay the same as if you were in standard tuning. The guitar just has a lower register. Many people will drop tune a half step and the capo the 1st fret. Thus they can play in standard with the capo on and drop a half step with it off. I have played with a buddy that likes SRV and also likes playing everything a half step down. So we each bring two guitars (as I hate using a capo). One guitar in standard 440 and the other 1/2 step down. We do about 5 of his songs in the lowered tunings and switch guitars back to the normal tuning for my next 5. It has more to do with our vocals than it does with the guitars. I'll drop it [pun intended] for now...
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#2913040 - 03/04/18 02:43 PM Re: Ultra light strings. [Re: Scott Fraser]
Larryz Offline
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Originally Posted By: Scott Fraser
Originally Posted By: whitefang
The only flatwounds I ever used were FENDER strings that came out back in the late '60's and really didn't sound all that great. I wasn't aware some manufacturers still made 'em though, and I guess I can imagine they've improved some over the decades.
Whitefang


They are still made & fairly common. A lot of jazz guys really like flatwounds. The Good: they pretty much totally eliminate string squeak when changing position. The Bad: I think they sound dull & thunky, & sustain far less than round wound strings.


+1 Scott, flat wounds are easy to find in most guitar stores and on line as many companies like Pyramid, Thomastik, DAddario, Bella, etc., have them on the market. They are super silent for string squeak and are very comfortable on the fingers. Jazzers love them. I have used them for quite some time, but they are thumpy and dull on the bass strings IMHO. But mellow is the name of the game in the jazz world and the lack of string squeak adds to the ambiance...

I have switched back to round wound nickel as I like the brighter bass sound that I get. The coated strings like Elixir can soften the squeak a little but I don't care for the coat fraying on coated strings down at the bridge area where I pick. I find I can get the same squeak result (maybe a little better) with the Helix wound nickel from Dean Markley. I also switched to using a plain 3rd instead of a wound one. It gets rid of a lot of squeak too, much like my nylon stringed guitar does. Polished wound strings get rid of some of the squeak too in nylon sets. Unwrapped strings don't squeak at all...cool


Edited by Larryz (03/04/18 02:46 PM)
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#2913044 - 03/04/18 02:55 PM Re: Ultra light strings. [Re: Larryz]
d Offline
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Originally Posted By: Larryz
Originally Posted By: d
Originally Posted By: Larryz
@ d, I think of "altered tuning" when you tune to a chord like A tuning, G tuning, etc. and change the tuning from standard. "Drop tuning" for me, is when you remain in standard tuning and drop all of the strings down. "Lowered tuning" may be a better way of describing it. I've heard many players (including Setzer) refer to "drop D" tuning where everything stays in standard but the E 6th string is dropped down to D. I don't know how far back in time these concepts go. +1 it was being used in rock and roll in the 50's and many of the old blues players used altered tunings long before the rock and roll boys came along...

So ?
Yer attempted explanation only points up why I avoided that term in the 1st place.
There's a def diff between "dropped tuning" as a general term for altered tunings involving various strings & overall lowered pitch.


Basically we are saying the exact same thing. The difference in what most call altered tuning is that you tune to a chord...as in A tuning G tuning D tuning E tuning , etc. When doing drop tuning we are describing you lower the pitch of all 6 strings one half step from where they are tuned at 440 or to a piano in concert tuning. The difference is when doing altered tuning all of your intervals change for the most part, while doing drop tuning all of the intervals stay the same as if you were in standard tuning. The guitar just has a lower register. Many people will drop tune a half step and the capo the 1st fret. Thus they can play in standard with the capo on and drop a half step with it off. I have played with a buddy that likes SRV and also likes playing everything a half step down. So we each bring two guitars (as I hate using a capo). One guitar in standard 440 and the other 1/2 step down. We do about 5 of his songs in the lowered tunings and switch guitars back to the normal tuning for my next 5. It has more to do with our vocals than it does with the guitars. I'll drop it [pun intended] for now...

Sounds like a pointless fan's approach to me.
1/2 step change ? To what real diff ?
I suggest you try what I do w/ a second gtr. Tune down a full step.
That allows one access to diff chord shapes/voicings that allow the effect of altered tunings but requires no rethinking of the fretboard + it has the added kick, to me, of confusing those tryna figure out what yer doing ! grin
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#2913045 - 03/04/18 02:55 PM Re: Ultra light strings. [Re: skipclone 1]
Larryz Offline
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Originally Posted By: skipclone 1
If I really want to, I can greatly reduce or eliminate string squeak when changing chords. But it`s exhausting, and an added burden if one is singing too. There`s no big secret, basically it`s a matter of changing positions more vertically than is common.


+1 Skip...when I first picked up a nylon stringed guitar the bass strings squeaked like a big dog while the trebles were silent. I found a polished set by D'Addario for recording that greatly reduced the squeak factor. Not as bright but not as squeaky either. I learned to lift my chord fingering hand a little before proceeding to the next chord instead of sliding into it. That little technique took a lot of the squeak out of my playing.

But, I like sliding so much, I had to go to the polished strings. Pyramid makes a polished steel string set and I thought I found nirvana, but in two new sets the 6th strings broke and unraveled before I could even get them on the guitar. So I found a set of unpolished nickel Dean Markley Helix wound that are getting the job done for me and are much brighter on the bass notes... cool
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#2913048 - 03/04/18 03:08 PM Re: Ultra light strings. [Re: d]
Larryz Offline
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Originally Posted By: d
1/2 step change ? To what real diff ?
I suggest you try what I do w/ a second gtr. Tune down a full step.
That allows one access to diff chord shapes/voicings that allow the effect of altered tunings but requires no rethinking of the fretboard + it has the added kick, to me, of confusing those tryna figure out what yer doing ! grin


I just got rid of the guy and haven't had the problem since LOL! I'm not good enough to play with Double Trouble and SRV anyway! But it is true that when someone drops to any key or uses altered tunings, I can keep up with them by using scales and noodling. They can't figure out why they can't lose me LOL! It's only when chording that the guys using the lowered tuning chords can simply play a C Am F G pattern while you have to adjust, invert, etc. to play along with every song pattern they come up with. It has more to do with the lead vocals and accompaniment. My capo buds will never understand the horrors they put me through. They don't even know what key they are playing in. They'll call out keys like F+3 or G+1, etc. On C+2, I'll ask them: "Why don't you just play the F***ing song in D?" cool
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#2918072 - 03/29/18 01:39 PM Re: Ultra light strings. [Re: Scott Fraser]
Tommy Ritter Offline
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I used those Mexican lottery 7's for a week on my R8. They made the tone a tad thinner, but not as bad as I worried it would. But they did make it sound more "boingy", if that makes sense. And there was zero feel to it. I found I have way to heavy of a touch to use light strings. These 7's made my guitar feel like it had a scalloped fretboard!

And whenever people talk about light strings and tone, they always mention Billy Gibbons using 7's. True. But when he recorded the tone that made him famous, he was using really thick strings. 11's or 12's depending on the source. I much prefer 11.5's, big core, pure nickel Dunlops. Those fit me best.

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#2918098 - 03/29/18 04:15 PM Re: Ultra light strings. [Re: Tommy Ritter]
Larryz Offline
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WELCOME ABOARD TOMMY RITTER! I like pure nickel 10's... thu


Edited by Larryz (03/29/18 04:19 PM)
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#2918136 - 03/29/18 10:29 PM Re: Ultra light strings. [Re: Larryz]
Caevan O'Shite Offline
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Registered: 04/05/02
Posts: 24837
Loc: The Great Spirit's Handprint o...
Originally Posted By: Tommy Ritter
I used those Mexican lottery 7's for a week on my R8. They made the tone a tad thinner, but not as bad as I worried it would. But they did make it sound more "boingy", if that makes sense. And there was zero feel to it. I found I have way to heavy of a touch to use light strings. These 7's made my guitar feel like it had a scalloped fretboard!

And whenever people talk about light strings and tone, they always mention Billy Gibbons using 7's. True. But when he recorded the tone that made him famous, he was using really thick strings. 11's or 12's depending on the source. I much prefer 11.5's, big core, pure nickel Dunlops. Those fit me best.
Originally Posted By: Larryz
WELCOME ABOARD TOMMY RITTER! I like pure nickel 10's... thu


b]Yes, welcome to the GPF, Tommy Ritter.

While I am all for anyone who likes really light strings enjoying what works for them, and I recognize that they do have their own unique part in a tonal recipe, I personally prefer medium to heavy strings, myself.

If you like those Dunlop big core pure nickel 11.5's, you would probably also like the DR Pure Blues 11's that I love; round-core basses wound with solid/pure nickel.

I will soon be trying out some Thomastik-Infeld BeBop Jazz-Wound double-wound solid/pure nickel on round-core strings, on a hollowbody Jazz archtop; larger than usual core wire, with a double-layered wrap of finer than usual winding-wire. I'll let everyone know how I like them when I get them on that guitar...


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#2918168 - 03/30/18 06:21 AM Re: Ultra light strings. [Re: Caevan O'Shite]
Scott Fraser Offline
MP Hall of Fame Member

Registered: 03/20/05
Posts: 5243
Loc: Los Angeles
I just saw an interview video with Robin Trower, who's using 12 - 48's on his signature custom shop Strats. He can get away with it because he's tuned down a whole step.
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#2918171 - 03/30/18 06:29 AM Re: Ultra light strings. [Re: Scott Fraser]
Winston Psmith Offline
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Registered: 02/15/10
Posts: 3577
Loc: Inside the Beltway
Originally Posted By: Scott Fraser
I just saw an interview video with Robin Trower, who's using 12 - 48's on his signature custom shop Strats. He can get away with it because he's tuned down a whole step.


Also, IME, bolt-on necks are more stable with higher string tensions.
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#2918218 - 03/30/18 11:16 AM Re: Ultra light strings. [Re: Caevan O'Shite]
Tommy Ritter Offline
Member

Registered: 03/27/18
Posts: 3
Loc: Fort Mill, SC
Thanks for the warm welcome! Yes, those Dr's are my other go to string. Very similar in tone and feel. I like the heavier low E string on the GHS, so that's my only reason to switch. Both great strings.

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#2918220 - 03/30/18 11:20 AM Re: Ultra light strings. [Re: Tommy Ritter]
Tommy Ritter Offline
Member

Registered: 03/27/18
Posts: 3
Loc: Fort Mill, SC
I made a mistake above. Not that it matters, but my favored string is the GHS big core nickel rockers in 11.5. I highly recommend them if you like a heavier string!

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#2918240 - 03/30/18 03:35 PM Re: Ultra light strings. [Re: Tommy Ritter]
A String Administrator Offline
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Registered: 12/18/03
Posts: 12176
Loc: Ontario, Canada
Round here, I'M the favourite string.

lol wink
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