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#2909377 - 02/13/18 04:43 PM How Are You Preserving Your Body of Work?
Jazzooo Offline
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Registered: 01/17/01
Posts: 598
Loc: San Miguel de Allende, Mexico
I know that a percentage of responses will be jokes, mostly from people who don't feel it makes any difference if anyone hears their music after they are gone (maybe even now, for that matter).

But as a composer, I don't feel that way and I'm betting that I'm not the only one. I've put a lot of energy into the music that felt important to me, and I love that a handful of human beings have stuck with me throughout the years, buying and/or appreciating the work I felt was my best. In case anything happens to me, I'd like to have a searchable collection of my best work...somewhere. Maybe for my wife, my brother, or anyone they tell about me. Maybe for friends who want to try a cover of a Doug Robinson tune. Maybe (most likely) for no one at all but better to have it than not.

A while back I spent a few weeks weeding through over 1100 songs, demos, soundtrack cuts, corporate music themes, etc to pick my personal 'best of' in different music categories. I compiled the best tracks as iTunes playlists by style and produced CDRs...which of course are going to be useless soon. I'm finding fewer and fewer people who even have CD players these days and by the time I die, who knows how much rarer they will become.

in addition, when I changed computers, iTunes shit all over my playlists, mixing other artists' songs in with mine, replacing dozens of carefully-selected tracks.

So right now, I'm thinking of just dedicating a stand alone hard drive with folders in various categories. I do have a loose arrangement with an A list jazzer friend to choose a handful of my best unreleased songs and do an album (that I will fund from beyond the grave) with his friends, and since the songlist keeps growing and changing as I continue to live, the final version would also be on this drive.

And then I guess I give it to my wife who keeps it stored somewhere? Maybe a copy to my brother although he's older than I.

What about you guys?

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KC Island
#2909379 - 02/13/18 04:49 PM Re: How Are You Preserving Your Body of Work? [Re: Jazzooo]
GRollins Offline
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Registered: 09/01/17
Posts: 787
Formaldehyde.

Grey
_________________________
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#2909382 - 02/13/18 04:57 PM Re: How Are You Preserving Your Body of Work? [Re: GRollins]
GRollins Offline
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Registered: 09/01/17
Posts: 787
Okay, in a more serious vein...

As of a few years ago, I started writing my stuff down. As in actual notes. It's a bitch, because I can't read or write sheet music, but I was determined to catalog my ideas, so I tucked in my shirt tail, stood up straight, and started learning at least the rudiments of how to get the stuff down. No, it's not "correct" in some theoretical sense, I'm sure, but when I play it back on MuseScore, the right notes happen in the right order at something approximating the right timings.

Yay, me...go Team Grey.

I've begun sporadic recordings, but I find that I'm still creating faster than I'm setting things down, and for that, I want to write it down first so I can attend to some of the more glaring errors.

I figure that if I leave written music in addition to recordings, then it's up to someone else to pull it together.

Grey
_________________________
I'm not interested in someone's ability to program. I'm interested in their ability to compose and play.

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#2909387 - 02/13/18 05:31 PM Re: How Are You Preserving Your Body of Work? [Re: GRollins]
marino Offline
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Registered: 10/20/00
Posts: 7886
Loc: Rome, Italy
Tell me about that. A couple of months ago, after a computer change and a further swap of components, the main archiving hard disk crashed just when I was going to do a complete backup - and the other HD where I had most of the same data turned out to be unusable too!
I'm now thru the long and painful process of recovering 10 years of material from older supports. The sense of loss is undescribable, and also of guilt for not having backed everything up right away.

Fortunately, I was able to recover the audio files of the tracks for an album that I have recorded long ago, and that for some inexplicable reason I have delayed since... also, all the scores and demos for another, rather complex project which i hope to materialize this year.

On a more musical level, I have also been browsing a couple dozen of old manuscript books, and found several pieces of music that perhaps, deserve to be brought back to life...

Despite the present dreadful situation of musical things, especially in my country, I keep believing that the best way to preserve one's music is to make albums and having them published. I'm not playing my own stuff live these days, but I have a *lot* of completed projects in the drawer - not just ideas, but entire albums, with all the tunes already arranged and ready to be recorded. Mostly jazz, but other stuff too.
I feel that the only way to throw all this music in the world, as opposed to leaving it in the drawer, is to have it published in some way - with a catalog number and everything, so that it appears in a search, etc. - and have it reviewed. Yeah, I know that the record industry is pratically dead... but this way, you at least have the chance that someone will listen to it.
Ruminations of an old-school musician, I guess...

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#2909388 - 02/13/18 05:51 PM Re: How Are You Preserving Your Body of Work? [Re: marino]
#%$(# Offline
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Registered: 04/21/13
Posts: 5064
Loc: Orlando, Florida
If you're serious you'll want at least three forms of backup, one of those being optical media to protect from an EMP blast. Of course you'll want to keep the various physical backups in safe, separate locations.

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#2909389 - 02/13/18 05:55 PM Re: How Are You Preserving Your Body of Work? [Re: #%$(#]
mate stubb Online   content
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For better or worse, I'm a player not a composer. I've composed a few things, but it's hard enough just holding on to audio I have recorded over the years.

I would guess the old pen and paper will outlast anything digital, and chiseled stone tablets will outlast that.
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#2909390 - 02/13/18 05:56 PM Re: How Are You Preserving Your Body of Work? [Re: marino]
Jazzooo Offline
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Registered: 01/17/01
Posts: 598
Loc: San Miguel de Allende, Mexico
Yes, it's a conundrum alright--no industry to speak of and us, more prepared than ever to release our music into the void.

I've released, on my own little indie label, several CDs under my own name since 1991. You'd think that I'd be satisfied with a total of 13 CDs' worth of material...but I'm not. For one thing, each of those albums are so different that they aren't accurate depiction of my abilities by themselves. I've got a solo piano CD, a live orchestral piece of work with Prehispanic instruments, acoustic jazz trio, melodic fusion, all-star with top jazz cats, ones where i play all of the instruments, a Randy Newman-esque vocal CD and more.

But more than that--I scored an indie film in the '90s. Not a great film or score, but a few of the cues are definitely in my 'best of' files; some of the demos I've recorded between 1972 and 2018 belong there too, as well as some of my commercial work...I'd just like it all in one location, one format, where anyone/no one can hear it if they want to explore.

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#2909392 - 02/13/18 06:04 PM Re: How Are You Preserving Your Body of Work? [Re: Jazzooo]
GRollins Offline
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Registered: 09/01/17
Posts: 787
The long term problem is that anything on a computer will become obsolete, in terms of the file formats and the programs required to read the files. The only solution is to go through every single file at, say, five year intervals and make sure that it's readable by some sort of program.

So what happens after you're dead and no one is willing to invest the time and effort to preserve your files?

That's why paper was invented.

Grey
_________________________
I'm not interested in someone's ability to program. I'm interested in their ability to compose and play.

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#2909394 - 02/13/18 06:25 PM Re: How Are You Preserving Your Body of Work? [Re: GRollins]
Jazzooo Offline
Gold Member

Registered: 01/17/01
Posts: 598
Loc: San Miguel de Allende, Mexico
That is the long term problem alright. I figure though that wav files on a hard drive stand a decent chance of lasting a few years, although countability will probably change before wav files become defunct.

I've notated some of my solo piano pieces--I've had the thrill of hearing other players interpret them--and I'll do a few more but I really feel the demos and recordings I'm talking about overall are best enjoyed by hearing them, not reading them which narrows your audience down in a big way.

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#2909401 - 02/13/18 07:13 PM Re: How Are You Preserving Your Body of Work? [Re: Jazzooo]
GRollins Offline
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Registered: 09/01/17
Posts: 787
Aye, but the title of the thread says "preserving," not "listening to." They're not the same thing.

Grey
_________________________
I'm not interested in someone's ability to program. I'm interested in their ability to compose and play.

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#2909404 - 02/13/18 07:37 PM Re: How Are You Preserving Your Body of Work? [Re: Jazzooo]
GregC Offline
MP Hall of Fame Member

Registered: 10/26/03
Posts: 5273
Loc: Discovery Bay, California
Originally Posted By: Jazzooo
I know that a percentage of responses will be jokes, mostly from people who don't feel it makes any difference if anyone hears their music after they are gone (maybe even now, for that matter).

But as a composer, I don't feel that way and I'm betting that I'm not the only one. I've put a lot of energy into the music that felt important to me, and I love that a handful of human beings have stuck with me throughout the years, buying and/or appreciating the work I felt was my best. In case anything happens to me, I'd like to have a searchable collection of my best work...somewhere. Maybe for my wife, my brother, or anyone they tell about me. Maybe for friends who want to try a cover of a Doug Robinson tune. Maybe (most likely) for no one at all but better to have it than not.

A while back I spent a few weeks weeding through over 1100 songs, demos, soundtrack cuts, corporate music themes, etc to pick my personal 'best of' in different music categories. I compiled the best tracks as iTunes playlists by style and produced CDRs...which of course are going to be useless soon. I'm finding fewer and fewer people who even have CD players these days and by the time I die, who knows how much rarer they will become.

in addition, when I changed computers, iTunes shit all over my playlists, mixing other artists' songs in with mine, replacing dozens of carefully-selected tracks.

So right now, I'm thinking of just dedicating a stand alone hard drive with folders in various categories. I do have a loose arrangement with an A list jazzer friend to choose a handful of my best unreleased songs and do an album (that I will fund from beyond the grave) with his friends, and since the songlist keeps growing and changing as I continue to live, the final version would also be on this drive.

And then I guess I give it to my wife who keeps it stored somewhere? Maybe a copy to my brother although he's older than I.

What about you guys?


I think I follow your post. Let me summarize.

You have your 'source material ' ( your 1100). Songs from other artists mostly.

I have this on various forms of media, cassette, CD, iTunes. Fairly organized.

Then I have My Material, my originals and stuff I have covered with multi track SEQ/Kronos. Now thats the stuff I am preserving properly. its my portfolio of songs I created/recorded.

It sits on Sound Cloud. I have CD's of it. I have the Kronos Song files and WAV;s on USB drives, and on my mac hard drive. Organized were I can find it quickly.
This is my musical history and will last 30 yrs or more.

Don't know if this helps . I am serious about preserving my Song recordings

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#2909413 - 02/13/18 09:04 PM Re: How Are You Preserving Your Body of Work? [Re: GregC]
Jazzooo Offline
Gold Member

Registered: 01/17/01
Posts: 598
Loc: San Miguel de Allende, Mexico
"You have your 'source material ' ( your 1100). Songs from other artists mostly."

No, it's all mine. I went through it and narrowed it down a while back. There are about 350 pieces (so far in my life) that I want organized and searchable, in the hopes that they will live a few minutes longer than I do. smile


"It sits on Sound Cloud. I have CD's of it. "

My thinking is that Soundcloud will not necessarily outlive me. In fact, if I had to bet against it I would even though I like it and use it today. FWIW, I think it was here on the Keyboard Corner that I first saw rumors that they were not far from going under, but I have no first hand knowledge and hope it doesn't happen. As for CDs, as I said...if I'm leaving behind recorded music, I don't think audio CDs are the best media to use from this point forward. Many new cars are being mfrd. without CD players--my new Kia Sportage, for example. I think it's the middle of the end.

I know there will be other Soundcloud-like opportunities if Soundcloud folds, but eventually these types of things do die off, whether it's MySpace or Soundcloud. But maybe a pro account at Soundcloud is the way to go for the immediate future while I figure this out.

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#2909414 - 02/13/18 09:06 PM Re: How Are You Preserving Your Body of Work? [Re: GRollins]
Jazzooo Offline
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Registered: 01/17/01
Posts: 598
Loc: San Miguel de Allende, Mexico
"Aye, but the title of the thread says "preserving," not "listening to." They're not the same thing."

Ok, I can see the confusion. I want to leave music behind for people to listen to if they are so inclined.

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#2909416 - 02/13/18 09:19 PM Re: How Are You Preserving Your Body of Work? [Re: Jazzooo]
davedoerfler Online   confused
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Registered: 12/27/12
Posts: 6852
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Hey Doug, I'm just glad you have recovered enough from your tragic fall that you are able to empower this project. Best to you. twothumbs
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#2909419 - 02/13/18 09:36 PM Re: How Are You Preserving Your Body of Work? [Re: davedoerfler]
Jazzooo Offline
Gold Member

Registered: 01/17/01
Posts: 598
Loc: San Miguel de Allende, Mexico
Thanks, Dave! I'm doing pretty well.

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#2909433 - 02/14/18 02:12 AM Re: How Are You Preserving Your Body of Work? [Re: Jazzooo]
GRollins Offline
Gold Member

Registered: 09/01/17
Posts: 787
Make a list of all the recorded music formats we've had so far, wax cylinders, records, tape, LPs, CDs, etc. Of them, the LP has had the best track record (so to speak), but even that's not a sure thing, going forward.

The "pure, perfect sound, forever" advertising slogan used at the inception of the CD was, at best, a hollow promise. CDs are not really that much more robust than LPs. The sound quality debate is something I won't get into here. Self-recorded CDs are useless; frequently unreadable after a mere five to ten years due to problems with the dyes. Commercial ones stand a better chance, but the format is clearly dying, anyway.

Look at the SACD. Well, more to the point, look for an SACD. They were supposed to take over from CDs, but it didn't work out.

Streaming? Don't make me laugh. Think it through:
1) Your music is dependent on a company staying in business. If you think companies are forever, make a list of the ones that have been in their original field of business for over, say, fifty years. How many are leaders in their field? How strong are they, financially? Technologically?
2) Look at Netflix. It's news when they add and delete movies from their menu. Your music will be available at the whim of the corporation. Don't tell me about their policies today. Tell me (I'll stop and wait while you build a time machine) what their policies will be in ten years.
3) You'll also be at the mercy of a user interface over which you have no control. What if they make your music (by accident or design) unfindable?
4) Security. If the [fill in the blank: Russians, Chinese, Koreans, Nigerians...] hack the streaming service--and they will, because it's a lovely way to get malware onto devices--then your music may get deleted "out of an abundance of caution" or, just as bad, the company acquires a reputation as being unsafe, so no one uses their service anymore.
5) You're one format change away from the scrap heap of history. See many cassettes these days? 8-track tapes? VCR or Betamax tapes? What happens when streaming (the current darling, but these things change) gets superseded by, say, direct beaming to a node in your skull? Every format is touted as permanent...until it's obsolete.
6) Oh, never mind...I see that I've been grumpy. Sorry. It's just that there is no such thing as a sure thing.

Write the music down. Put it out in all known formats and hope for the best. Based on track records to date, I'd place my bet on written sheet music and the LP.

I think I'll go contemplate butterflies and pretty girls for a while. I've obviously pegged my Grump-O-Meter and I need to take a break while someone else extols the virtues of the latest "sure thing" (read: doomed) format.

*sigh*

Grey
_________________________
I'm not interested in someone's ability to program. I'm interested in their ability to compose and play.

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#2909445 - 02/14/18 05:01 AM Re: How Are You Preserving Your Body of Work? [Re: Jazzooo]
GregC Offline
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Registered: 10/26/03
Posts: 5273
Loc: Discovery Bay, California
Originally Posted By: Jazzooo
"You have your 'source material ' ( your 1100). Songs from other artists mostly."

No, it's all mine. I went through it and narrowed it down a while back. There are about 350 pieces (so far in my life) that I want organized and searchable, in the hopes that they will live a few minutes longer than I do. smile


"It sits on Sound Cloud. I have CD's of it. "

My thinking is that Soundcloud will not necessarily outlive me. In fact, if I had to bet against it I would even though I like it and use it today. FWIW, I think it was here on the Keyboard Corner that I first saw rumors that they were not far from going under, but I have no first hand knowledge and hope it doesn't happen. As for CDs, as I said...if I'm leaving behind recorded music, I don't think audio CDs are the best media to use from this point forward. Many new cars are being mfrd. without CD players--my new Kia Sportage, for example. I think it's the middle of the end.

I know there will be other Soundcloud-like opportunities if Soundcloud folds, but eventually these types of things do die off, whether it's MySpace or Soundcloud. But maybe a pro account at Soundcloud is the way to go for the immediate future while I figure this out.


I see, thats better. 350 is a more manageable # than 1100.

as a song writer, not every Song idea I create is wonderful. Harsh but true.

So my Songs have to meet approval from a group of 10 friends. Another keyboard friend calls it my ' jury trial '.

Simply if a song does not get approval today, it will not in 30 years.
I keep the rejects on a USB drive, since there might be a bridge or chorus (partial) that can be used elsewhere.

SoundCloud is just an example. Don't take it literal. But you should think about tomorrows media source for your best songs, after you are gone from the planet. If you stuff your 350 on a CD, and no one has a CD player or MP3 goes away in 30 years, you have lost the entire project of preservation.

So today, Spotify, Google Play, iTunes seem to be stable. You need to look forward on storage. This might get expensive so you should organize a project to take this a step at a time, get it organized.

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#2909447 - 02/14/18 05:16 AM Re: How Are You Preserving Your Body of Work? [Re: GRollins]
Markay Offline
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Registered: 01/28/12
Posts: 2825
Loc: Australia
To the OP - no matter how you archive you music there is always going to be a nilihist along shortly to convince you your mission is pointless.

As a naive optimist I would suggest you archive in both in WAV and FLAC format to an external HDD or SSD. Then every 5 years copy them to whatever media type is current at the time.

WAV and FLAC are open format and will survive longer than whatever propriety format MS or Apple deign to be their audio format de jour. Looking at you wma.

Also put it on Soundcloud and YouTube, there are free programs that will auto generate video to accompany audio.

By doing this you as the composer and your songs will be 'published' and auto archived. This will be captured by the Way Back machine so even if the original files no longer exist in the future there is a record of the title and you as the composer.

Don't fret about the perils of nuclear war, if that happens then only cockroaches will be around to listen to your music.

Get it out there now at minimum cost and give future generations the best chance of discovering your music.
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#2909456 - 02/14/18 05:56 AM Re: How Are You Preserving Your Body of Work? [Re: Markay]
SkiGuy777 Offline
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Registered: 02/19/17
Posts: 188
Loc: Plantation FL
Great thread. The problem is the people in the future won't care about you. Maybe your immediate wife and kids will keep your hard drive and look, but the next generation won't. And that technology will become obsolete, all technology does. I've converted VHS tapes of my daughter to digital. Will she care to go back and look at it? In 50 years will there still be MP3, WMV, and JPEG formats?

I have multiple backups of all my pictures, and YouTube videos I've created of me playing. I have a clone drive in the computer case, and 3 USB drives, one at my daughters if my house burns down. The best software to back up a storage drive is called Beyond Compare 4. It can mirror files from one drive to another.

The idea of leaving behind a lasting memory is interesting. People want their memory to live on, but it eventually fades. It's funny because I listen to the 40s and 50s channel on Sirius and think how at the time, those people were stars.


Edited by SkiGuy777 (02/14/18 07:43 AM)
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#2909467 - 02/14/18 06:35 AM Re: How Are You Preserving Your Body of Work? [Re: SkiGuy777]
ProfD Offline
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Registered: 05/11/06
Posts: 9413
Loc: Wash DC Area
IMO, the best we can do is record our music to CD or tape and hope that it lasts. cool
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"The greatest thing you'll ever learn, is just to love and be loved in return."--E. Ahbez "Nature Boy"

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#2909475 - 02/14/18 07:20 AM Re: How Are You Preserving Your Body of Work? [Re: SkiGuy777]
GregC Offline
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Registered: 10/26/03
Posts: 5273
Loc: Discovery Bay, California
Originally Posted By: SkiGuy777
Great thread. The problem is the people in the future won't care about you. Maybe your immediate wife and kids will keep your hard drive and look, but the next generation won't. And that technology will become obsolete, all technology does. I've converted VHS tapes of my daughter to digital. Will she care to go back and look at it? In 50 years will there still be MP3, WMV, and JPEG formats?

I have multiple backups of all my pictures, and YouTube videos I've created of me playing. I have a clone drive in the case, and 3 USB drives, one at my daughters in case my house burns down.

The idea of leaving behind a lasting memory is interesting. People want their memory to live on, but it eventually fades. It's funny because I listen to the 40s and 50s channel on Sirius and think how at the time, those people were stars.


You are speaking the truth AFAIAC.


For example, folks that like music from the 50's are dying off. As I circulate, discuss music , promote my material in my local area, I find there is next to no interest in 60's pop music. I find this lack of interest to be disappointing.

I am not referring to the occasional Beatles tribute band playing in Vegas or Tahoe. Thats not a strong indicator of 60's revival overall

I am not discouraging anyone from playing 40's/50's be-bop or boogie boogie or the many classics of those decades. Thats not the context here.

My bottom line is I will have the attention of family and friends at my passing. My material will be there for distribution and listening for all of 45 minutes.

I stand for my original material. That is how I will be remembered, however briefly.

Thats about it. You don't have to face your mortality now. But at some time you will be forced to. You might consider the attention span and interest of folks currently.

Andy Warhol said something about everyone having 15 minutes of fame.


Edited by GregC (02/14/18 07:21 AM)

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#2909491 - 02/14/18 08:11 AM Re: How Are You Preserving Your Body of Work? [Re: GregC]
GRollins Offline
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Registered: 09/01/17
Posts: 787
I'm still waiting for my 15 minutes of fame. It may have been taken by Paris Hilton, the Kardashians, certain political figures...I'm not sure, but it hasn't happened yet and I don't see it coming anytime soon.

I'd like to think that my original music has sufficient merit that it would appeal to a cult/niche market, but aside from the very real possibility that I'm delusional, there's the difficulty of actually getting my music in front of those (putative) supporters. It probably won't happen. The only person who's bummed about this is me. Regardless, the world will go on. I choose to be philosophical about it. As I've said elsewhere, I regard my music as a kind of therapy. True, it's expensive, but it's cheaper than seeing a therapist and a lot more fun.

Grey
_________________________
I'm not interested in someone's ability to program. I'm interested in their ability to compose and play.

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#2909500 - 02/14/18 08:22 AM Re: How Are You Preserving Your Body of Work? [Re: GRollins]
GregC Offline
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Registered: 10/26/03
Posts: 5273
Loc: Discovery Bay, California
Originally Posted By: GRollins
I'm still waiting for my 15 minutes of fame. It may have been taken by Paris Hilton, the Kardashians, certain political figures...I'm not sure, but it hasn't happened yet and I don't see it coming anytime soon.

I'd like to think that my original music has sufficient merit that it would appeal to a cult/niche market, but aside from the very real possibility that I'm delusional, there's the difficulty of actually getting my music in front of those (putative) supporters. It probably won't happen. The only person who's bummed about this is me. Regardless, the world will go on. I choose to be philosophical about it. As I've said elsewhere, I regard my music as a kind of therapy. True, it's expensive, but it's cheaper than seeing a therapist and a lot more fun.

Grey


I use to get discouraged, but no longer. I have minimal ego, which helps

I have a small bunch of enthusiastic listeners. There feedback and encouragement does help. While I do some covers they want me to go 100% original. Because my originals stand up taller than known cover songs. Not per me, thats their request. Its flattering.

As far as more local promotion, thats where it becomes a letdown. Over the past few years, I can the # of folks into jazz on 1 hand.

Thats a ' tell' when I discuss music around town, since my stuff is eclectic and there is a rough correlation between jazz appreciation and my material.

Now if lived in San Francisco or Oakland, I think I would get a stronger result from my promotion.

IOW, the fine arts and jazz appreciation does not exist sufficiently in my neighboring towns.

I think understanding whats what and getting outside the bubble is the key.

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#2909502 - 02/14/18 08:32 AM Re: How Are You Preserving Your Body of Work? [Re: GregC]
Stokely Offline
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Registered: 12/15/12
Posts: 1696
Loc: Florida
I'd say a local copy or two and some kind of cloud storage. It's a pretty good bet that amazon/google are going to be around for quite some time...businesses are putting most or all of their data up there now. Whatever you do I think will need attention from someone down the road...physical media can wear out/get lost, cloud services go away etc. An interesting topic. I remember how bummed my college-era friend was that all the cd #3s (of his 4-cd set) containing all our original band's stuff had gone bad. Everyone that had the set had a bad 3rd disk...

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#2909546 - 02/14/18 10:19 AM Re: How Are You Preserving Your Body of Work? [Re: Stokely]
MAJUSCULE Online   happy
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Registered: 06/10/09
Posts: 4600
Loc: Edmonton, Alberta
This is more or less what I've done. Doesn't include all the different categories talked about in the OP, but it has everything I've been on that has ever been released (even if it's since been taken down).
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#2909549 - 02/14/18 10:28 AM Re: How Are You Preserving Your Body of Work? [Re: MAJUSCULE]
Jazzooo Offline
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Registered: 01/17/01
Posts: 598
Loc: San Miguel de Allende, Mexico
Nice, Eric. I'm having an epiphany of sorts, will talk more about it later. But I like your stuff, the little i heard. Cold Fire had kind a Hot Rats feel to it.

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#2909555 - 02/14/18 10:35 AM Re: How Are You Preserving Your Body of Work? [Re: Jazzooo]
Jazzooo Offline
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Registered: 01/17/01
Posts: 598
Loc: San Miguel de Allende, Mexico
As for what others think of my music, or whether they do at all--it's none of my business what others think of me. I know the chances to have the successes I've had were extremely limited and yet I pushed through and carved my own path. I've had a nice career, certainly not the one I dreamed of but it's hard to complain.

As for whether it's important that anyone has ever wanted to or will ever want to listen to anything of mine--well, it's important to me, and I'm not sure why that isn't enough of a reason to consider the possibilities.

I mean, one of my heroes is Don Grolnick, the late great keyboardist/composer who spanned fusion, mainstream jazz and pop (the latter in part as James Taylor's musical director for well over a decade). He only released a handful of albums under his own name, and I've got everything, practically know it all by heart. Although it might be different in this forum, he is still likely to be completely unknown to 99% of musicians, let alone civilians.

Want to argue that he was unimportant? Why? Because he probably didn't sell many CDs in his lifetime? He was important to me, to his friends, to the other musicians he played with like Michael Brecker and Peter Erskine. If I found a site with his unreleased tracks, demos and so on, I'd be in heaven and would spread the word.

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#2909569 - 02/14/18 11:42 AM Re: How Are You Preserving Your Body of Work? [Re: Jazzooo]
Jazzooo Offline
Gold Member

Registered: 01/17/01
Posts: 598
Loc: San Miguel de Allende, Mexico
EVERAFTER POSTMORTEM PUBLISHING
WELCOME VIDEO SCRIPT

(In the center of the EverAfter.com/dougrobinson home page is a video screen, surrounded by a half dozen links. Press ‘play’ and Doug Robinson’s image comes to life…)

Doug:

Hi—I’m Doug Robinson. Thanks for checking out this EverAfter Postmortem Publishing page.

I was born in 1955 in San Diego, CA. I spent most of my first 50 years in California and then moved to central Mexico. Not sure when and where I died, but that info is available in the ‘profile’ section of this page. Who knows--maybe I died during the filming of this introduction--keep watching to see!

From the time I was 9, it was clear to my family that I had some musical gifts. I started composing music in my beginning piano classes; I could pick up a new instrument and within minutes I could fake a decent performance just from watching others. Later in life I was a professional player who could easily fit with musicians on various instruments and in several styles, and a composer/arranger who bounced from project to project as I pleased.

Working with the staff at EverAfter, I’ve created this page as an archive of what I consider to be my best work. If you click here (DR gestures to the link in the upper right corner of his screen) you will be able to hear any of my finished albums from beginning to end, or randomly listen to tracks from each of them. Of course I come from a time when the concept of ‘albums’ meant cherished compilations meant to be listened to in a certain song order, and mine were no exception. But you can enjoy them however you like.

If I had been a more stylistically focused composer, then one or two of my albums might have sufficed, but like my heroes The Beatles, Pat Metheny, Miles Davis, I strived to cover a lot of ground artistically (and since I’m still alive while recording this message, I hope to complete at least a couple more before I kick the bucket).

As it stands now, you’ll see that I have a body of professionally-recorded work that ranges from light classical solo piano, melodic and tight jazz/rock fusion—often featuring a handful of all-star musicians of the day, acoustic piano trio jazz, experimental work that combines classical, jazz and pre-Hispanic instruments, Randy Newman-esque singer/songwriter material, and what I think is pretty engaging one-man band instrumental material.

Those are just some examples of the types of music contained on my 13 album titles which you’ll find right here (gestures again).

If you’re a fan, then you know about some of that music. But what you might find interesting are some of the 350 other tracks I’ve provided, for example here (gestures to middle right) where there is a link called ‘Demos.’ These are tracks I never got around to finishing, although while some are simple solo piano sketches, others are more fully fleshed out. What makes these special is that I loved them but they were never released.

The same goes for the tracks found here (gestures to the middle left) where you’ll find a few cues from my independent movie score, or here (gestures to upper left) where you can hear singer/songwriter material that never saw the light of day.

A lot of these tracks are good enough quality, artistically and in terms of audio reproduction, to use in your own projects if you’re looking for something from my era. To that end, we’ve set up an arrangement with EverAfter where you can pay a small one-time fee for each piece of music you want to use, with half going to my family and the other half going towards maintaining this site for myself and thousands of other composers, photographers, painters, poets and creative types. You can read more about this in the ‘About Us’ section.

I wish that my favorite artists and musicians who came before me had had a resource like everAfter, where I could hear more creative work from them than the distribution schemes of their time allowed us to hear. In that spirit, again I thank you for visiting this page and I hope you will explore to your hearts’ content, and invite your friends to join you. There is more info about me in my ‘Bio’ section, but I think it’s time to just start listening.

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#2909571 - 02/14/18 11:43 AM Re: How Are You Preserving Your Body of Work? [Re: Jazzooo]
Jazzooo Offline
Gold Member

Registered: 01/17/01
Posts: 598
Loc: San Miguel de Allende, Mexico
Just a thought.

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#2909663 - 02/14/18 04:27 PM Re: How Are You Preserving Your Body of Work? [Re: Markay]
CowboyNQ Offline
Gold Member

Registered: 06/14/15
Posts: 678
Loc: Adelaide, Australia
Originally Posted By: Markay
...no matter how you archive you music there is always going to be a nilihist along shortly to convince you your mission is pointless.

As a naive optimist...


Recommended reading for the nihilist: "Ozymandias" by Shelley.

Recommended reading for the optimist: "On Children" from "The Prophet" by Gibran.

Both short, easy and beautifully written.

More power to your mission, Doug!

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