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#2896723 - 12/19/17 06:27 AM The Great Piano Pushback
ElmerJFudd Online   content
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http://mmrmagazine.com/5936-the-great-pi...u-s-market.html

"Adaptation and a solid expertise of your field have always been the keys to the longevity of a career or independent store, and after 50 years in the business of selling pianos, Joe DeFio is a walking encyclopedia.

“I’ve seen it all. Pretty much every job in the industry that could be done, I’ve done. The only thing I don’t do is teach or tune,” he says.

After leaving the army, DeFio cleverly got a job at an employment agency to scout out all the jobs in the area. When he spotted an opening for a piano salesman, he jumped on it. At 21, he started to learn the piano and organ business, and today at 71, he’s still hooked.

Originally from Syracuse, New York, DeFio moved to Kansas City to work with a chain of P&O stores owned by Jenkins Music, later working for the Hammond Organ Company and other manufacturers.

Now executive vice president for Vienna International, DeFio answers his phone seven days a week and uses his expertise to help navigate the company. Since he started working with Vienna International, his work with the company has been instrumental in elevating Hailun from almost unknown in the United States to an in-demand, award-winning brand. In 2012, for instance, MMR readers selected Hailun Pianos for the “Piano Line of the Year” Dealers’ Choice Award, and the brand has been adding up awards ever since.

Most recently, DeFio’s mission has been to push to get acoustic pianos back into MI stores; namely, Hailun and Petrof, both lines that Vienna International sells. His mission is to address all the changes that the market has undergone recently, and make selling acoustic pianos work for those dealers.

“Over the past six or seven years, things have changed drastically,” he explains.

With a rise in digital pianos and a fall in acoustic pianos on the market, tackling the piano industry hasn’t exactly been a simple ordeal.

If anything, DeFio says that he has been pushing for a full-on reversal of how piano stores have been developed in both minor and major market areas.

Over five decades dealing with all aspects of the keyboard business, he’s witnessed first-hand the dramatic changes in the music industry, such as the demise of the once popular accordion business, the collapse of the home organ and the spinet piano, and the crash in used piano prices.

“Originally, most piano departments were in full-line stores selling musical instruments, stereos, etc,” Defio says. “They were doing so well with the piano divisions that some of those locations turned into all-piano stores. The way things are going, however, I see a reversal of that. Now at Vienna we are going to concentrate on new small startups (many are piano techs), and MI stores to have small acoustic piano departments, helped in every step by our expertise in marketing the instruments to consumers, using our business model to sell pianos for our dealers not to them.”

Years ago DeFio saw big changes coming, and started to map out what the future would hold for the market and planning out what Vienna International should do to be successful in that highly competitive and shrinking market.

“Many cities, even ones that have very large populations, are down to one or two piano stores. They’re the only outlets for new pianos in these cities. The choices for consumers are very limited and dictated by a few very large manufacturers . More outlets in more areas will provide choices for people and, in addition, MI dealers and tech dealers will add to their revenue stream, a win-win situation!” DeFio explains.

The industry has also changed as a result of online shopping, with sites like Amazon being a new go-to for people who need instruments – thus taking away business from local stores. While pianos don’t seem like an instrument that customers would buy on a whim (“buying a piano can be very iffy if you don’t play it” DeFio notes), but there are still people out there who are making those major purchases online because they can’t find new pianos anywhere near where they live.

The current situation makes it even more vital for pianos to get back into musical instrument stores – and Vienna International has the advantage of size on their side. DeFio describes Vienna International as an efficient, hands-on company in which everyone performs many roles. Because they are a relatively small company without a large, cumbersome corporate hierarchy, they can initiate changes and carry out plans much faster than most other distributors can.

“Anybody can try to do what we’re doing now, but we’ve got great products and a five-year head-start on the concept, we address the new norm with our ears to the ground and we are already proficient in dealing with smaller outlets,” DeFio says.

Paired with a heavy social media presence, DeFio is dedicated to making pianos accessible to the end user in more places across North America and the world. This has already started as Vienna International has just been awarded the Hailun distribution rights for Europe and Africa (a formal announcement will be forthcoming).

“It’s going to get harder before it gets easier,” he says. But if anyone can handle the ebb and flow of the market, it’s this piano guru."
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KC Island
#2896726 - 12/19/17 06:36 AM Re: The Great Piano Pushback [Re: ElmerJFudd]
Lou_NC Offline
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Registered: 07/19/17
Posts: 8
Not to hijack this great post and thread, but..........what ever happened to Piano and ORGAN stores? When I started playing organ back in the 70's, every piano store sold organs too. My mom even learned to play organ as I was taking lessons on our trusty Wurlitzer (with built-in "Orbit" synthesizer).

No knock against pianos, but I strongly prefer organ (playing both manuals AND pedals), to me it's a far more "complete" instrument to play as a solo musician.

Lou

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#2896730 - 12/19/17 06:49 AM Re: The Great Piano Pushback [Re: ElmerJFudd]
Wastrel Offline
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Originally Posted By: ElmerJFudd
Over five decades dealing with all aspects of the keyboard business, he’s witnessed first-hand the dramatic changes in the music industry, such as the demise of the once popular accordion business, the collapse of the home organ and the spinet piano, and the crash in used piano prices.


Umm...yeah. Moving on.
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#2896731 - 12/19/17 06:52 AM Re: The Great Piano Pushback [Re: Lou_NC]
AnotherScott Offline
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I don't think there are any companies making home console style "do it all" organs anymore. I think that market ended up being largely addressed by arranger keyboards. At least in the U.S. Elsewhere, I think the Yamaha Electones are still a thing...
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#2896733 - 12/19/17 06:55 AM Re: The Great Piano Pushback [Re: Lou_NC]
ElmerJFudd Online   content
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Trends in music making, right? As the public's taste changes so do the sales opportunities (and lack thereof). There was an article recently about manufacturers like Gibson and Fender lamenting the decrease in electric guitar sales. But obviously access to these instruments isn't the factor as you can get a guitar anywhere. But acoustic pianos - it has always been a high end sales experience - more like buying a luxury car than a musical instrument. Getting them into MI stores is probably a very good idea for the manufacturers (not so great for the mom and pop piano dealers that have survived - although they find themselves carrying digital options these days as well). Price is a factor too - the markup and profit margin will probably need to fall more in line with the other instruments MI dealers carry.

On the preference of organ over piano - they don't sound anything alike... the technique is different, the repertoire written for them is different - both now have a very long heritage of virtuosic players and pieces in many styles of play. There's room in the world for both, one need not choose and there are many who play both well. But at the same time, there are aspects of play on both that someone who spends more time on the other would find challenging when jumping back and forth.
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#2896748 - 12/19/17 08:05 AM Re: The Great Piano Pushback [Re: ElmerJFudd]
Joe Muscara Offline
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Good for him/them. I hope it works out as it would be great to see. Houston is lucky as we have a few piano dealers including a Steinway Piano Gallery and a Kawai Piano Gallery, as well as a few other general dealers. But I would love to see more acoustic pianos in more places, here and in other towns and cities.
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#2896752 - 12/19/17 08:14 AM Re: The Great Piano Pushback [Re: Joe Muscara]
Wastrel Offline
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Originally Posted By: Joe BrokeIt
Good for him/them. I hope it works out as it would be great to see. Houston is lucky as we have a few piano dealers including a Steinway Piano Gallery and a Kawai Piano Gallery, as well as a few other general dealers. But I would love to see more acoustic pianos in more places, here and in other towns and cities.

I think that all of us keyboard players who grew up in the piano/organ in every living room era would love to see it - nostalgically - but at the same time, I think that anyone tempted to invest in the idea should take a cold hard look at the practicality of turning back the clock. I just don't see it happening. Particularly at today's price point for a decent acoustic piano.
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#2896755 - 12/19/17 08:32 AM Re: The Great Piano Pushback [Re: Wastrel]
Jazzmammal Offline
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Loc: Redondo Beach, CA
It could work if he speaks Chinese...

Not joking here, there are articles about new piano sales doing well in Asia and there is a lot of Asian immigration.

Bob

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#2896758 - 12/19/17 08:40 AM Re: The Great Piano Pushback [Re: Jazzmammal]
ElmerJFudd Online   content
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This is true from what I read. Inexpensive acoustic uprights are in reach of the new middle class in China. Spurred interest by the success of Lang Lang... they are having their Van Cliburn moment. Many goods out of China are in their next stage of higher quality. I would not be surprised to see a Chinese piano brand someday rival Kawai or Yamaha. At the same time I've been pleasantly surprised by Petrof on more than one occasion.
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#2896760 - 12/19/17 08:56 AM Re: The Great Piano Pushback [Re: ElmerJFudd]
cphollis Offline
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I think there's been a generational shift in attitudes towards piano and learning musical instruments in general.

When I was growing up, almost every home had some sort of piano in it, almost a totem of middle-class success.

Kids like me learned multiple instruments (recorder, trumpet, percussion, trombone, etc.) but learned one well (e.g. piano, guitar).

Maybe that movie is playing again in China.
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#2896764 - 12/19/17 09:05 AM Re: The Great Piano Pushback [Re: ElmerJFudd]
GRollins Offline
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Registered: 09/01/17
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There's a simple, practical reality that gets overlooked: People these days move too much to own a piano.

My maternal grandmother bought a house in the 1930s or so and lived in that same house until she moved into a care facility towards the end of her life. She did not own a piano. She did not own an organ (though she loved the thought of someday learning to play one). That was a span of sixty years or more. She would have been an ideal candidate for an organ because the instrument would never have to be moved. I tried to talk her into attempting her dream of playing organ, but the price was a problem.

Skip forward a single generation. My mother lived in at least nine places that I can identify off the top of my head--probably more that will come to me later.

I've lived in at least ten.

Pianos and organs aren't (excepting a full grand piano) so much of a big item as they are a heavy item. Add fragility, plus the expense to buy and maintain such an instrument, and people just aren't up for it at this point in history. Ain't practical. Not going to happen.

However...I started a thread here a couple of months ago in which I predicted a change in music if the economy tanks. One corollary point that I did not make at that time is that people will quit moving as often if their incomes are threatened. Something like that could lead to a resurgence in acoustic piano and organ sales. So, in that sense, I would say that there is a possibility--if the purchase price barrier can be overcome.

Grey
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#2896768 - 12/19/17 09:25 AM Re: The Great Piano Pushback [Re: cphollis]
BluMunk Offline
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Meh. While there will always be room for a few boutique dealers, piano as a home instrument is dead.

Why? Fewer and fewer people own their own homes. No one has the room, or the inclination to invest in a massive instrument when they're in a rental, particularly if they don't view the specific rental as a long-term living arrangement.

I'm 37 and am one year into home ownership. There's no way I would have been able to have even an upright in any of my previous housing arrangements, either because of stairs, shared living space, and shared walls. Never mind the added complications/expenses that would have been involved every time I moved (which averages out to about once every two years since 2001). Even now, my house is way too small for a piano, unless my partner and I decided that all of my practicing, playing, and noodling would take place in the small open livingroom/kitchen that is our ground floor, and she would not be able to watch TV, listen to anything else, or do work without listening to the piano every night.

Digital pianos didn't kill acoustic pianos; changing demographics, home life, and housing costs killed acoustic pianos.

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#2896769 - 12/19/17 09:26 AM Re: The Great Piano Pushback [Re: BluMunk]
BluMunk Offline
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Beat to the punch by GRollins!

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#2896779 - 12/19/17 09:57 AM Re: The Great Piano Pushback [Re: BluMunk]
MathOfInsects Offline
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The parlor piano died when Baldwin started using their factory to make coffins during WWII.
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#2896782 - 12/19/17 10:08 AM Re: The Great Piano Pushback [Re: MathOfInsects]
cphollis Offline
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Agree with the demographic shift to smaller living spaces and more frequent residence moving. Any acoustic piano is a big, heavy instrument.
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#2896786 - 12/19/17 10:30 AM Re: The Great Piano Pushback [Re: BluMunk]
tarkus Offline
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Good points all.
I grew up with an early 20th century Kranich & Bach player piano, baby grand. My siblings and I destroyed that piano because we were stupid kids and my parents were fed-up with shananigans, yet the big piano remained.
About 15 years ago my sisters decided to have the piano restored. An estimate to restore it to its early 20th century glory tipped into $10K and up!! (it had real ivory keys and yes there is a huge difference in ivory to synthetic!).
It also had a pneumatic/electric system to engage the piano roll and player system. All the hoses and rubber tubes (no doubt natural rubber) were completely rotted or brittle.
I suggested that it was too far gone to be restored as a player piano and the action was so heavy it discouraged most people from playing. The soundboard was warped but not cracked, but no guarantee it would survive. With age and without proper humidity and temperature control, the old family piano gave up the ghost. Levers, springs, and myriad internal functions needed to be replaced. It was unplayable.
I suggested to my sibs to keep the case, but completely gut the thing and sell the parts to a collector for refurb use.
The furniture was serviceable and I drew up plans to place amplification and speakers where the soundboard was located.
Either a pair of tens or twelves would have resided under the hood. A nice gilded grill or grate (easily fabricated from an antique fireplace screen) would have made it look purposeful or "steampunk" for the period. Pre-amp, amplifier, pedal controls (original pedal tree and brass pedals could have been retrofitted) would have worked.
The keyboard would be replaced with a quality digital piano or controller board. I estimated my cost around $3000 including the refinishing of the wood. This would have been a great DIY, but my sisters wanted nothing to do with it.
They hired a guy to do a rebuild. He gutted the piano and installed new keys and action. We were told it needed to acclimate before it was playable. Within a week 1/3 rd of the keys didn't work, it went out of tune and the pedals became unresponsive. They spent $7k!!!
The piano was recently sold in an estate sale for a few hundred bucks!

I have no desire to become a real piano owner but if I was able to do my modernization, I wouldn't have parted with that old baby for nothing!

Occasionally I'll come across a rescued piano. The owners learn the hard way that each piano has its own peculiarities in response to climate. A friend of mine recently asked if I would like to tune his piano (NO WAY!) since he couldn't afford it anymore.

I see many used upright and spinet pianos for sale, but no takers, for many of the reasons others have stated above.

Once I do finally plant the flag on a permanent residence for my retirement, I will build a console for my keyboards in homage to a forgotten era. No x-stands, no ultimate stands, no a-frames. An organ console of my design to house the boards,the amps, the speakers and cables. Heck, I'll even build a wing on it to house the theremin.
Now I need a house with a garage to build the thing!


Edited by tarkus (12/19/17 10:34 AM)

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#2896788 - 12/19/17 10:38 AM Re: The Great Piano Pushback [Re: cphollis]
burningbusch Offline
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Home ownership in the USA has been between 63% and 66% since the mid 1960s. We had a jump up to 69% prior to the economic recession (triggered by housing) in the mid 2000s. We are currently at 64%. In the 1950s it was 55%. Average time of staying in a home is ~13 years.

https://fred.stlouisfed.org/series/RHORUSQ156N

Acoustic instruments are difficult in the home. If you're going to practice for two hours, everyone else in the household needs to accommodate as it will be heard throughout the house. Grand pianos were designed to fill much larger spaces than a living room. Digital offers the ability to turn down the volume or to use headphones. They are simply more practical.

My CL is filled with new and used acoustic pianos, all varieties and price points.

Busch.

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#2896789 - 12/19/17 10:38 AM Re: The Great Piano Pushback [Re: tarkus]
Stokely Offline
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Loc: Florida
I had an interesting conversation with my piano tuner, who is really awesome at what he does and is ultra-knowledgeable about pianos. Unfortunately he pointed out my acoustic has a terminal soundboard issue (cost more than the worth to fix). He sees the writing on the wall about digitals for sure, and figures there's a chance he won't be in business much longer (or at least he'll need to supplement with something else.)

Part of the problem is that people tend to move more than they used to, because our jobs change more than they used to among other reasons--that's my reason that I'd be getting a digital despite loving acoustic pianos. I also can't afford a nice acoustic, and don't know enough about used ones to tell a lemon from a great deal. I can buy a *really* nice used digital from Guitar center for the price of an ok spinet/console and know exactly what I'm getting, and can take it back locally within 30 days if there is a problem...it's hard to compete with that.



Edited by Stokely (12/19/17 10:39 AM)

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#2896792 - 12/19/17 10:47 AM Re: The Great Piano Pushback [Re: Stokely]
tarkus Offline
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Technology fills the void. Years from now the majority of Keyboards will not be physical per se. You will hit a smart phone app and a projection of a keyboard configuration could be applied anywhere in any config. They are already doing it with virtual controllers.

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#2896793 - 12/19/17 10:52 AM Re: The Great Piano Pushback [Re: Stokely]
Outkaster Online   content
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There is two things here. It’s not moving alone. Music in an undervalued commodity and disposable mostly due to technology taking over. Kids don’t play outside hardly and no one has pianos at home. I-pads, games and smart phones are what kids are into. They could give a shit about an acoustic piano. We are musicians so we can’t look at it like the general population does.

My buddy is one of the top tuners in the area and tells me plain and simple…people don’t want pianos. He gave a free Yamaha U1 because I customer didn’t want it. There are three manufactures of pianos now in the states now. He told me they collectively are producing less than 1000 instruments a year. That is amazing compared to even 25 years ago. He found an upright Steinway in good shape for free a couple years ago but I didn’t have room for it.
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#2896794 - 12/19/17 11:04 AM Re: The Great Piano Pushback [Re: Stokely]
burningbusch Offline
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According to NAMM data, here are the 10-year unit trends:

Grand Pianos: -61%
Vertical Pianos: -41%
Total Acoustic Pianos: -49%
Digital (home) Pianos: +24%
Total Pianos: -1%

Home Organs: -76%
Institutional Organs: -69%
Total Organs: -74%
You have to understand the home organ market was dead before this -74% drop. In 2007 ~6,000 home organs were sold in the USA. That is now down to ~1,500 units. In contrast, the acoustic piano market is ~28,000 units sold USA.

Keyboard Synthesizers: +26%
Digital Pianos/Pro Organs (slab pianos/clonewheels): -58%

Busch.

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#2896802 - 12/19/17 11:26 AM Re: The Great Piano Pushback [Re: Outkaster]
synthizen2 Offline
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At this point in the game, if you are living in a house and expect to be living there for quite a while (or the rest of your life), you have the space, and you want a grand piano... with some patience and research, you should NOW be able to get a decent grand piano for your home, for FREE! (You just need to pay for a hauling/moving service, that's all).
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#2896807 - 12/19/17 11:44 AM Re: The Great Piano Pushback [Re: burningbusch]
ElmerJFudd Online   content
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Good points generally...
A P45 can be had for $399.99 and if your kid sticks with it great. You can upgrade to something nicer later. Obviously the same is true for adult hobbyists. This is an incredible development. They're cheap, portable, take up little space, and you can practice in silence. No maintenance costs.

And at the same time there is a high end digital piano like the Yamaha N3X or forth coming Novus 10 and everything in between these extreme price points.

On the other hand, a well made and maintained acoustic sounds great. It's resonant and immersive with natural overtones that tech struggles to reproduce in the room for the player and listener. And generally speaking the quality of build and playability of acoustic actions is still generally better than most digital pianos. But this will not always be the case - Kawai, Yamaha, and Casio are actively working on bridging this divide. Amp+Speaker systems in digitals still lag behind string, harp and sound board. I'm not sure when and how they will tackle this, but they are working on it.

And obviously a crowd like us can appreciate there is nothing like sitting at a grand piano, but most are out of reach. That's why I was fortunate to find musical joy in a rebuilt 1920 Chickering. I hope to get the Steinway someday (like our buddy Dave Ferris). It's not looking good right now, but who knows once I get out from under a mortgage and put my kid through college.

It's true, you can easily get your hands on acoustics from 100-50 years ago, but don't expect they won't need some work, depending on how well you expect them to sound and play. Holding tune, felt replacement, some voicing work goes a long way. On an old grand with a good brand name you intend to keep, you can go all out with new tuning block, sound board, strings, felts, just about everything can be replaced.
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#2896811 - 12/19/17 11:56 AM Re: The Great Piano Pushback [Re: ElmerJFudd]
Outkaster Online   content
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Yeah but we aren't the crowd is my point. You used to see pianos and organs in a ton of homes. Now not so much and even from people that can afford them.
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#2896812 - 12/19/17 12:06 PM Re: The Great Piano Pushback [Re: Outkaster]
Stokely Offline
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Registered: 12/15/12
Posts: 1864
Loc: Florida
Originally Posted By: Outkaster
There is two things here. It’s not moving alone. Music in an undervalued commodity and disposable mostly due to technology taking over. Kids don’t play outside hardly and no one has pianos at home. I-pads, games and smart phones are what kids are into. They could give a shit about an acoustic piano. We are musicians so we can’t look at it like the general population does.


While this is definitely true--I have to pry my kids off their devices at every turn if I want them to do anything else, including eat--I will say I'm pretty amazed at how many kids are into band starting in middle school. Doesn't help with pianos much, but I was astounded at two things when the 6th grade beginners had their xmas concert: 1) how many of the tykes there were and 2) how good they sounded, especially considering they had just picked up a very complex instrument a few months ago!

On the down side, you could throw in the "bands must play tracks to meet audience needs" issue. The public at large doesn't seem to value performance vs having tracks play or a DJ spin tunes (which takes skill mind you, but it's a different skill)

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#2896817 - 12/19/17 12:15 PM Re: The Great Piano Pushback [Re: ElmerJFudd]
MathOfInsects Offline
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Originally Posted By: ElmerJFudd
A P45 can be had for $399.99 and if your kid sticks with it great. You can upgrade to something nicer later. Obviously the same is true for adult hobbyists. This is an incredible development. They're cheap, portable, take up little space, and you can practice in silence. No maintenance costs.


And more important--it will sound far better than a piano that costs ten times as much.

The old wisdom used to be, if you're not going to spend $5K, buy digital. I would not be surprised if that number is $7500 now.
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#2896836 - 12/19/17 01:37 PM Re: The Great Piano Pushback [Re: ElmerJFudd]
Dave Ferris Offline
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Loc: Glendale, Ca.
Originally Posted By: ElmerJFudd
And obviously a crowd like us can appreciate there is nothing like sitting at a grand piano, but most are out of reach. That's why I was fortunate to find musical joy in a rebuilt 1920 Chickering. I hope to get the Steinway someday (like our buddy Dave Ferris).
It's true, you can easily get your hands on acoustics from 100-50 years ago, but don't expect they won't need some work, depending on how well you expect them to sound and play. Holding tune, felt replacement, some voicing work goes a long way. On an old grand with a good brand name you intend to keep, you can go all out with new tuning block, sound board, strings, felts, just about everything can be replaced.


There's no way I could have acquired my piano without two factors - trading/selling up and a once in a lifetime deal from a private party that fell into financial trouble and had to sell at 9 months out.

Regarding re-built or re-conditioned--- I would trust something from the Steinway Factory in Astoria or Klavierhaus in NYC. Maybe from a few dealers I've heard YouTube examples of on Piano World. Other then that, it's hugely a crap shoot.

Astronomical new pricing aside ( my piano has shot up just under 50% in 11 years !!) , I agree the housing situation, along with the living logistics within a multiple member family household, are a huge deterrent to owning a grand.

I'm very fortunate we had the dough, at the time, and were able to convert the 400 sq. ft. space of the garage to a very cool space for the piano.

Before that , while my wife was working at home, we had a hard time co-existing with the Yamaha S6 in the living room and her in the middle bedroom office. We could close off the living room with two doors but still, in an 1750 sq. ft. house, you're still gonna hear a 7' piano.
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https://soundcloud.com/dave-ferris

2005 NY Steinway D





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#2896839 - 12/19/17 02:27 PM Re: The Great Piano Pushback [Re: Outkaster]
JazzPiano88 Offline
Senior Member

Registered: 11/16/15
Posts: 415
Loc: USA
Originally Posted By: Outkaster
There is two things here. It’s not moving alone. Music in an undervalued commodity and disposable mostly due to technology taking over. Kids don’t play outside hardly and no one has pianos at home. I-pads, games and smart phones are what kids are into. They could give a shit about an acoustic piano. We are musicians so we can’t look at it like the general population does.

All true. Back in the good ole days, the piano was both a source of music for the home and a source of entertainment.

So there is no reason anymore to have a 300-1000lb behemoth in your home unless you are, or aspire to be, a pianist. The vast majority get their music and entertainment from other sources.

It's kind of sad (from the perspective of a pianist), but there's no going back.
_________________________
J a z z P i a n o 8 8

Yamaha C7D | Montage8 | CP300 | CP4
Hammond SK1-73 | DSI OB-6

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#2896846 - 12/19/17 02:50 PM Re: The Great Piano Pushback [Re: JazzPiano88]
burningbusch Offline
MP Hall of Fame Member

Registered: 10/22/00
Posts: 7947
Loc: Ghost Planet
Originally Posted By: JazzPiano88

All true. Back in the good ole days, the piano was both a source of music for the home and a source of entertainment.


Prior to radio, it was a major source of entertainment in the home. There was usually someone who could play well enough to accompany others singing. Player pianos were extremely popular as well. I believe this continued through the radio days but by the time TV came along, the role of the piano in the home changed.

According to this, peak piano sales in USA was ~1910 at 360,000. Remember the population was less than 100 million.

http://www.bluebookofpianos.com/uspiano.htm

Busch.

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#2896849 - 12/19/17 03:02 PM Re: The Great Piano Pushback [Re: burningbusch]
Rally Offline
Member

Registered: 05/03/14
Posts: 26
Originally Posted By: burningbusch
Originally Posted By: JazzPiano88

All true. Back in the good ole days, the piano was both a source of music for the home and a source of entertainment.


Prior to radio, it was a major source of entertainment in the home. There was usually someone who could play well enough to accompany others singing. Player pianos were extremely popular as well. I believe this continued through the radio days but by the time TV came along, the role of the piano in the home changed.

According to this, peak piano sales in USA was ~1910 at 360,000. Remember the population was less than 100 million.

http://www.bluebookofpianos.com/uspiano.htm

Busch.



The item I find interesting from the Blue Book is the column for grand pianos. It seems to be the upright that has suffered the most, grands have for the most part remained steady and some of the later years increased sales year over year. With uprights at one time outselling grands 10 to 1 there is no denying what has happened to the industry.


Edited by Rally (12/19/17 03:03 PM)

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