Music Player Network Home Guitar Player Magazine Keyboard Magazine Bass Player Magazine EQ Magazine
Topic Options
#2832187 - 01/30/17 02:02 PM Hang On Sloopy, the general history, which will astound you
d Offline
MP Hall of Fame Member

Registered: 03/20/01
Posts: 5981
Loc: no longer lexington, Kenfunky,...
What & why ?

Hanging somewhere in the air between "Louie Louie" & The Beatles's "The End" this is one of the great forgotten whacks of garage rock.

ALL ABT THE STRANGELOVES
Consisting of Bob Feldman, Jerry Goldstein, and Richard Gottehrer, The Strangeloves' most successful singles were "I Want Candy," "Cara-Lin", and "Night Time".

Before the invention of The Strangeloves, the three-member team ‒ often going by FGG Productions ‒ had already scored hits for other artists including 1963's "My Boyfriend's Back" by the American female group, The Angels. Feldman and Goldstein had also recorded a couple of non-charting singles as the duo "Bob & Jerry" in 1961-62, and between 1959-61 had been members of various non-charting studio-based recording groups such as Bobbi and the Beaus, Ezra and the Iveys, and The Kittens. However by 1964, the "girl group" sound FGG Productions specialized in was going out of fashion, due to the prevalence of British Invasion-style beat groups. In order to keep up with market trends, FGG decided to "create" a ready-made foreign beat group consisting of themselves; deciding that they couldn't convincingly fake British accents, they opted to pretend to be Australians.

According to the press releases and publicity material issued about the group, The Strangeloves were three brothers named Giles, Miles, and Niles Strange who were raised on an Australian sheep farm. The brothers' fictional backstory involved getting rich with the invention of a new form of sheep crossbreeding (the long-haired "Gottehrer" sheep allegedly registered with the Feldman-Goldstein Company of Australia) which allowed them the time and financial freedom to form a band. The story did not exactly capture the public's imagination, but The Strangeloves' singles still performed respectably well, especially in the United States.

The Strangeloves' first single, "Love, Love (That's All I Want from You)", was actually released under the group name, Strange Loves, and only reached No. 122 on the US Billboard Hot 100. The group's subsequent releases were as The Strangeloves.

When their second single, "I Want Candy", became a hit in the middle of 1965, The Strangeloves found themselves in the unfamiliar and uncomfortable position of performing as live artists. This short-lived experience was followed by a road group composed of four session musicians who had actually helped to record The Strangloves' songs. The musicians in the initial road group were bassist/vocalist John Shine, guitarist Jack Raczka, drummer Tom Kobus, and saxophonist/vocalist Richie Lauro.

In early 1966, the road lineup was replaced by a trio of FGG studio musicians that more closely adhered to the founding concept: guitarist Jack Raczka (Giles Strange), drummer/vocalist Joe Piazza (Miles Strange), and keyboardist/vocalist Ken Jones (Niles Strange). In 1968, bass player Greg Roman became an integral part of the band. All studio material continued to be performed by Feldman, Goldstein and Gottehrer, with additional session musicians as required.

While performing on the road in Ohio in 1965 as The Strangeloves, Feldman, Goldstein, and Gottehrer came upon a local band known as Ricky Z and the Raiders, led by Rick Derringer (known as Rick Zehringer at the time). Recognizing their raw talent, the producers immediately brought Derringer and his band to New York, recorded Derringer's voice over an existing music track from The Strangeloves' album, I Want Candy, and released "Hang on Sloopy" as a single under the name The McCoys.

The Strangeloves' only LP, I Want Candy, was released in 1965 on Bert Berns' Bang Records, with several of the album songs having been released as singles. Other singles by The Strangeloves appeared on Swan Records and Sire Records.

The Strangeloves continued recording singles, with moderate American success, through 1968. In their "home" country of Australia, they only scraped the very bottom of the singles charts, but interestingly, a real Australian group "Johnny Young & Kompany" had a hit in their country in 1966 with a cover of the Strangeloves' "Cara-Lin" (re-titled "Cara-Lyn").

The FGG trio also collaborated on a charting 1965 single credited to The Beach-Nuts, and took on the guise of The Sheep for two charting singles in 1966. As well, Feldman and Goldstein (without Gottehrer) recorded charting hits as Rome & Paris in 1966, and as The Rock & Roll Dubble Bubble Trading Card Co. of Philadelphia 19141 in 1969. On his own Goldstein wrote, produced and arranged a 1966 solo single "Watch The People Dance" under the name Giles Strange, which failed to chart. Feldman and Gottehrer also issued a non-charting 1970 single ("Right On" b/w "Shakey Jakes") as "The Strange Bros. Show".

The following credit appeared on most Strangeloves records (as well as several other records produced by FGG): "arranged and conducted by Bassett Hand." In fact, there is no such person as Bassett Hand; it was a tongue-in-cheek pseudonym for the Strangeloves themselves. Two instrumental singles credited to Bassett Hand were released around the time The Strangeloves were getting started: "In Detroit" (1964) and "The Happy Organ Shake" (1965). Neither single charted nationally, although "In Detroit" appeared on a Chicago top-40 list as an "Up 'N' Coming" song in October, 1964.

Post-Strangeloves careers

Their songs have been covered by David Bowie, Bauhaus, The J. Geils Band, The Fleshtones, Aaron Carter and by Bow Wow Wow.

Gottehrer went on to later fame as a record producer of early CBGB's luminaries such as Richard Hell & The Voidoids, The Fleshtones, and Blondie, as well as being the co-founder of Sire Records along with Seymour Stein. He also worked with Robert Gordon, who was one of many who revitalized rockabilly in the late 1970s, and produced the critically acclaimed first album by Marshall Crenshaw. In the 1980s he continued with successful albums by The Bongos, their frontman Richard Barone, The Go-Gos and many others. He later founded the influential independent distribution company, The Orchard.

In his role as a producer and manager, Goldstein also continued to have an effect on the music world. He suggested to the band Nightshift that they team up with Eric Burdon, which became War, and had the Circle Jerks on his Far Out Productions management company and LAX record label.

All three members of The Strangeloves appear in contemporary on camera interviews in the feature documentary film BANG! The Bert Berns Story, which was co-directed by Bert Berns' son Brett Berns, together with Bob Sarles.

A BIT ABT THE MCCOYS
The original members of the McCoys were all from Union City; however, the Zehringer boys were initially from Fort Recovery, Ohio. Guitarist and lead singer Richard Zehringer (later known as Rick Derringer), his brother Randy (later known as Randy Z) on drums, and bassist Dennis Kelly. This first line-up was known as "The Rick Z Combo", and later known as "Rick and the Raiders". When Kelly left for college, the Zehringers were joined by bassist Randy Jo Hobbs, saxophonist Sean Michaels, and keyboardist Ronnie Brandon.[1] This was the line-up that took the name of "The McCoys". Brandon left the group in 1965 and was replaced by Bobby Peterson on keyboards.

One of their best-known songs is "Hang On Sloopy", which was #1 in the United States in the Billboard Hot 100 chart in October 1965 and is the official rock song of the state of Ohio. It also is the unofficial fight song of The Ohio State University Buckeyes and can heard being played at many Ohio State athletic events by the OSU bands. American sales alone were over one million copies.[1] Other hits include a Top 10 cover of "Fever" (Billboard #7), and a Top 40 cover of Ritchie Valens's "Come On Let's Go" (Billboard #21).

A cover of "Sorrow", the B-side of their version of "Fever", was a hit in the United Kingdom for The Merseys and was later covered again by David Bowie. Its opening line, "with your long blonde hair and eyes of blue" was quoted by George Harrison in the fadeout of "It's All Too Much", featured on the 1969 Yellow Submarine film soundtrack album.

Hang On Sloopy was such a hit in 1965 that tha Rollicking Rolling Stones hadda play it on tour of USA

The two Zehringer brothers (then known as Rick Derringer and Randy Z) and Hobbs became Johnny Winter's band for the albums Johnny Winter And and Live Johnny Winter And in 1970 and 1971 respectively. As backing musicians, both Derringer and Hobbs contributed to Winter's later releases, Still Alive and Well (1973), Saints & Sinners (1974) and John Dawson Winter III (1974). Derringer and Hobbs later played with Edgar Winter, as well as appearing on the Together: Edgar Winter and Johnny Winter Live album (1976). Hobbs later toured with Johnny Winter, but without Derringer, resulting in Winter's Captured Live! album (1976). Derringer also played with Steely Dan and Cyndi Lauper, among others.


Orig, by The Strangeloves
kinda sounds like a version of "Gloria" but has the famous lead line


McCoys hard smacking production from mid 1960s / bet they never met the horn players but they did copy the "Hey Let'z Give It To'em" form the Kingsmens "Louie Louie"


McCoys on TV, w/what?minus12yrsold RickD / sadly cuts before the gtr solo


Jeff Beck version w/ the YBirds pretending to be the Beach Boys / (incl a quote from the Isley Bros & Beatles) / REALLY, Ya GOTTA WATCH THIS TO BELIEVE WHAT HAPPENS !!!


Even Motown hadda sign on !


Lips McGee & the Boys whip one out from the vaults for all the fans / neither Keef nor Ron opts to play gtr solo


Lest y'think that's a 1-off, there's a slew of YT vids of them playing that "at fans request" at diff shows.

Rick shows how bad things can go wrong
_________________________
d=halfnote

Top
#2832491 - 01/31/17 03:13 PM Re: Hang On Sloopy, the general history, which will astound you [Re: d]
paulkondig Offline
Senior Member

Registered: 03/29/16
Posts: 275
Loc: Maryland, USA
I used too think it was Hang on Snoopy, not Sloopy!

Top
#2832516 - 01/31/17 04:42 PM Re: Hang On Sloopy, the general history, which will astound you [Re: paulkondig]
d Offline
MP Hall of Fame Member

Registered: 03/20/01
Posts: 5981
Loc: no longer lexington, Kenfunky,...
"Snoopy girl comes from a very bad part of town " ?
_________________________
d=halfnote

Top
#2832720 - 02/01/17 03:37 PM Re: Hang On Sloopy, the general history, which will astound you [Re: d]
paulkondig Offline
Senior Member

Registered: 03/29/16
Posts: 275
Loc: Maryland, USA
Well, when I was younger, and heard the song, I never understood the lyrics. Of course, nowadays audio playback is much better, then it was 40 or 50 years ago.

Top
#2833663 - 02/06/17 03:42 AM Re: Hang On Sloopy, the general history, which will astound you [Re: paulkondig]
paulkondig Offline
Senior Member

Registered: 03/29/16
Posts: 275
Loc: Maryland, USA
Actually, I think it was more the lead singer of the McCoy's that made me think of snoopy instead of Sloopy. The Strangeloves, I can hear the lead singer more clearly.

Top
#2835709 - 02/14/17 04:54 PM Re: Hang On Sloopy, the general history, which will astound you [Re: paulkondig]
d Offline
MP Hall of Fame Member

Registered: 03/20/01
Posts: 5981
Loc: no longer lexington, Kenfunky,...
Maybe it's cause Rick LOOKed like Snoopy ?
_________________________
d=halfnote

Top
#2835969 - 02/15/17 03:39 PM Re: Hang On Sloopy, the general history, which will astound you [Re: d]
paulkondig Offline
Senior Member

Registered: 03/29/16
Posts: 275
Loc: Maryland, USA
No, I think it was more like, having a hard time understanding Rick.

Top


Moderator:  A String, Bluesape