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#2755084 - 02/13/16 06:41 AM Modifying music for the better. Tools ?
RCHeliGuy Offline
Member

Registered: 07/06/15
Posts: 16
Loc: TN
I have a set of Martin Logan Ethos speakers that sound absolutely fantastic, however poorly recorded music sounds flat.

I have a set of bi-amped near field monitors mounted to the wall in front of my desk. They have a warm and pleasing sound to them.

What I'm hearing is that recordings that are not as well recorded sound better with the extra distortion of my monitor speakers.

The music that is beautifully recorded sounds fantastic on my Martin Logans, but on my Monitors it sounds a bit too "rich", thick, ...

It's a given that some people like the additional warmth/THD/richness and they buy tube amps etc..

My question is whether anyone has come up with a good way to introduce VARIABLE THD to music that approximates the effects of tubes or some speakers that are not as clean.

I love the sound of my HiFi stereo for almost everything, and I wouldn't want to add anything to the sound of most of my tracks. They sound absolutely fantastic as is. So I don't want to make a systemic change. However there are some albums that I like that just don't sing but sound better on lessor systems.

Ideally what I would like is a digital filter that could be used by something like JRiver that was associated with certain tracks that benefit from a bit of help and could add that pleasing warmth that I could dial in for each track or apply to a specific album.

My hope is that this would allow me to play a small list of albums that I enjoy musically, but that just don't sing on a more transparent sounding system.

Thoughts?

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#2755109 - 02/13/16 07:50 AM Re: Modifying music for the better. Tools ? [Re: RCHeliGuy]
Julf Offline
Senior Member

Registered: 03/08/13
Posts: 191
Loc: Amsterdam, The Netherlands
There are both software plugins (but not sure JRiver supports them) and hardware effects boxes for "tube simulation", but I think you are better off using sound processing software such as audacity to make pre-distorted copies of those specific albums, so you don't need to worry about it at playback time.


Edited by Julf (02/13/16 07:52 AM)

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#2755111 - 02/13/16 07:58 AM Re: Modifying music for the better. Tools ? [Re: Julf]
RCHeliGuy Offline
Member

Registered: 07/06/15
Posts: 16
Loc: TN
Originally Posted By: Julf
There are both software plugins (but not sure JRiver supports them) and hardware effects boxes for "tube simulation", but I think you are better off using sound processing software such as audacity to make pre-distorted copies of those specific albums, so you don't need to worry about it at playback time.


Interesting. The only issue with that is that it will take a lot of trial and error work and I would probably end up finding a single setting that seemed to work and just apply it to my short list of tracks.

I currently have Vegas Pro for video editing, but haven't gotten the Sound Forge or Audacity software.

I do see that even my copy of Vegas Pro has a distortion special effect. However I doubt it will provide the control I would like.

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#2755116 - 02/13/16 08:12 AM Re: Modifying music for the better. Tools ? [Re: RCHeliGuy]
Julf Offline
Senior Member

Registered: 03/08/13
Posts: 191
Loc: Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Vegas Pro supports VST plugins (as do the free adiacity and ardour packages), so you have a lot of choice. Here are some:
The Best Free VST Effects - Distortion

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#2755136 - 02/13/16 08:44 AM Re: Modifying music for the better. Tools ? [Re: Julf]
RCHeliGuy Offline
Member

Registered: 07/06/15
Posts: 16
Loc: TN
Sounds like a worthwhile experiment.

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#2756453 - 02/17/16 01:57 PM Re: Modifying music for the better. Tools ? [Re: RCHeliGuy]
RCHeliGuy Offline
Member

Registered: 07/06/15
Posts: 16
Loc: TN
I take it all back. My HiFi system sounds better across the board. I actually took the time to listen to the lesser recorded albums on both systems back and forth a few times.

The Monitor speakers sound good until you listen to the other system. Which is obviously a lot more realistic to listen to.

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