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Web Site Design #2744228 01/01/16 06:18 PM
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Paul K Offline OP
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Ladies and Gentlemen;

New Year, and I wish you all a happy one.

So I need a web page. I've gotten data on domain name registration and hosting. And I think I want to design it myself both as another thing to learn and because I don't want to have to play 8 gigs to pay for my web site design. I want it simple: A little bio with contact information, a coupe sexy pic's, calendar page, and links to to youtube and soundcloud channels. It could all even be on the same page.

So who's done it besides J.C.? Who's done it themselves? How and with which software? Did you downloaded the software, or do it on the browser? Free or did'ja have to pay for it? How much $$$? Was it worth it? What would you do different? Who cuts your hair?

Peace
Paul K


Things are just the way they are, and they're only going to get worse.
https://soundcloud.com/paul-kempkes
BP Island
Re: Web Site Design [Re: Paul K] #2744230 01/01/16 06:57 PM
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J. Dead Offline
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I've done a number of them over the years, some are still up. I was fortunate enough to work on my first one with a band mate who did that sort of thing for a living, which helped a lot. One thing you need to consider is maintaining it. Going in and editing the pages every time you need to update the calendar or add pictures is tedious. I've typically made my pages dynamic and tied them to a database on the web server. However, this requires server side scripting and database design and administration, which adds a level of difficulty to the initial web design. But it's slick when it's done. One web site had a whole back end I designed where band members could log in, put availability in the calendar, and anybody could add a gig by selecting the venue and entering a few details, and the web site would automatically update. The back end captured the date and time of the last edit and who made it.

Alternately, you can embed so,etching like a google calendar and YouTube videos.

For software, I've used everything from notepad (just typing the code and saving as html or php) to Dreamweaver, to Microsoft Visual Studio.

Here are all the things you may need to learn:
HTML, CSS, JavaScript, php, MySQL.

In addition, you'll likely need to have some skill with something like photoshop.

Here are a few I've done:
www.classx.net

www.ataritwins.com

www.ohbrotherstl.com


Dan

Acoustic/Electric stringed instruments ranging from 4 to 230 strings, hammered, picked, fingered, slapped, and plucked. Analog and Digital Electronic instruments, reeds, and throat/mouth.
Re: Web Site Design [Re: J. Dead] #2744299 01/02/16 12:53 AM
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Paul K Offline OP
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Thanks J. But you know....that doesn't really narrow things down at all for me. I'm looking to walk a little before I run.


Things are just the way they are, and they're only going to get worse.
https://soundcloud.com/paul-kempkes
Re: Web Site Design [Re: Paul K] #2744347 01/02/16 11:13 AM
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Ross Brown Offline
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yahoo site builder (now Aabaco Small Business) is what I use. You don't need to know anything. Does everything you need


"When I take a stroll down Jackass Lane it is usually to see someone that is already there"
Re: Web Site Design [Re: Ross Brown] #2744366 01/02/16 01:36 PM
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Richard W Offline
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I use GoDaddy Web builder for our band's site (www.dnrtheband.com). It is super easy to use and you don't need any special web design or programming skills. Pretty cheap too.


"Everyone wants to change the world, but no one thinks of changing themselves." Leo Tolstoy
Re: Web Site Design [Re: Richard W] #2744529 01/03/16 10:21 AM
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Paul K Offline OP
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Thanks. I'll give a look.

But not today. Car #1 wouldn't start yesterday...fuel pump, I think. And then I hit a deer with my wife's car coming home from a recording thing yesterday. I think that car is still driveable--but have to make sure that the hissing noise I heard is a puncture in the AC condenser, not the radiator.


Things are just the way they are, and they're only going to get worse.
https://soundcloud.com/paul-kempkes
Re: Web Site Design [Re: Paul K] #2744747 01/04/16 02:18 PM
Joined: Jul 2008
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J. Dead Offline
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I might have misunderstood your intent. I had the idea you wanted to learn a bit about web site development along the way.

If you just want the easiest, cheapest route to getting a single page out there that you don't intend to touch again (or very often), then there are lots of site builder tools out there. Many of the hosting companies offer a sitebuilder app of their own. When you evaluate hosting options, check their features - many offer this.

But I think the main intent of my post was lost. That is, you need to understand what you don't know. If it's just a splash page for people to see, that's one thing. But if you're going to need to continuously update it with things like calendar updates, news releases, pictures, videos, etc., then you're going to make sure that it's easy to update.

So let's back up just a little with this in mind.

First, you don't need any software to make a web page if you at least know HTML and preferably CSS. It's very easy, actually, and you can just type it in a text editor like Notepad and save it as a .html file. That's not the hard part. The hard part is having a good design in the first place that is visually appealing, not cheesy, easy to navigate, and a good experience for the visitor. That has nothing to do with knowing HTML, or using a sitebuilder app, but about being creative and following some basic guidelines about web design. And again, no matter what you use, some photo editing skills are extremely helpful not just for actual photos, but any other images you may wish to incorporate, not to mention understanding color scheme and other visual effects.

The site builder apps as well as some other development tools are called WYSIWYG (What You See Is What You Get) because you design it visually, and it generates to code to put on your site. The problem is that it has to accommodate anything anybody may come up with and publish it in a way that's compatible with a variety of browsers on various devices. So it's going to generate the code in a systematic way that may result in multiple files, subfolders, long code with randomly generated names and id's, that's next to impossible to follow if you look at the code itself. What this means, is that in order to edit one small thing on a page, you may have to go back to the app it was created in, edit it there, and regenerate the entire page, or entire site just for that small change. Where as if you wrote simple well formed HTML to begin with, it's really easy to just go right to the section that needs to be updated and do it.

My preference is kind of in the middle. I have software that allows you to kind of do both. You have one pane that shows the code and another that shows a preview. You can insert things and edit things either way. I still mostly go by the code, but with this software (and just about any designed for web design), it uses Intellisense. That's simply a color coding of the code you type so that it's really easy to spot any errors and differentiate the code from the content. In Internet Explorer, if you right-click on a page and select "view source", it shows the HTML this way.

Again, this all comes down to how much you want to customize it and how much you'll need to update it.


Dan

Acoustic/Electric stringed instruments ranging from 4 to 230 strings, hammered, picked, fingered, slapped, and plucked. Analog and Digital Electronic instruments, reeds, and throat/mouth.
Re: Web Site Design [Re: J. Dead] #2744874 01/04/16 10:09 PM
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Paul K Offline OP
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Excellent, J. Thanks.
I am looking forward to the process.


Things are just the way they are, and they're only going to get worse.
https://soundcloud.com/paul-kempkes
Re: Web Site Design [Re: J. Dead] #2745161 01/05/16 08:35 PM
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Bob Gollihur Offline
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Originally Posted By: J. Dan
I might have misunderstood your intent. I had the idea you wanted to learn a bit about web site development along the way.

If you just want the easiest, cheapest route to getting a single page out there that you don't intend to touch again (or very often), then there are lots of site builder tools out there. Many of the hosting companies offer a sitebuilder app of their own. When you evaluate hosting options, check their features - many offer this.

But I think the main intent of my post was lost. That is, you need to understand what you don't know. If it's just a splash page for people to see, that's one thing. But if you're going to need to continuously update it with things like calendar updates, news releases, pictures, videos, etc., then you're going to make sure that it's easy to update.

So let's back up just a little with this in mind.

First, you don't need any software to make a web page if you at least know HTML and preferably CSS. It's very easy, actually, and you can just type it in a text editor like Notepad and save it as a .html file. That's not the hard part. The hard part is having a good design in the first place that is visually appealing, not cheesy, easy to navigate, and a good experience for the visitor. That has nothing to do with knowing HTML, or using a sitebuilder app, but about being creative and following some basic guidelines about web design. And again, no matter what you use, some photo editing skills are extremely helpful not just for actual photos, but any other images you may wish to incorporate, not to mention understanding color scheme and other visual effects.

The site builder apps as well as some other development tools are called WYSIWYG (What You See Is What You Get) because you design it visually, and it generates to code to put on your site. The problem is that it has to accommodate anything anybody may come up with and publish it in a way that's compatible with a variety of browsers on various devices. So it's going to generate the code in a systematic way that may result in multiple files, subfolders, long code with randomly generated names and id's, that's next to impossible to follow if you look at the code itself. What this means, is that in order to edit one small thing on a page, you may have to go back to the app it was created in, edit it there, and regenerate the entire page, or entire site just for that small change. Where as if you wrote simple well formed HTML to begin with, it's really easy to just go right to the section that needs to be updated and do it.

My preference is kind of in the middle. I have software that allows you to kind of do both. You have one pane that shows the code and another that shows a preview. You can insert things and edit things either way. I still mostly go by the code, but with this software (and just about any designed for web design), it uses Intellisense. That's simply a color coding of the code you type so that it's really easy to spot any errors and differentiate the code from the content. In Internet Explorer, if you right-click on a page and select "view source", it shows the HTML this way.

Again, this all comes down to how much you want to customize it and how much you'll need to update it.


Which tool are you using, and are you aware of any lower priced versions? wink

I rolled my own back in the day, but then for years relied on Homesite for its shortcut buttons and quick preview function. It was bought out and later abandoned, and I'd love to put my hands on a replacement. TNX!


1000 Upright Bass Links, Luthier Directory, Teacher Directory - http://www.gollihurmusic.com/links.cfm

- Life is too short for bad tone -
Re: Web Site Design [Re: Bob Gollihur] #2745336 01/06/16 01:25 PM
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Russkull Offline
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Paul, I built a very simple website for our Rotary club using Weebly.com. Basically drag and drop design, easy upload of pictures, etc. Not much customization, but I didn't need it and maybe you don't either.

It's free if you don't mind the site address having "Weebly" in it (i.e. "www.paulk.weebly.com"). I think we're paying around $120 for 2 years to use our own domain and get a couple of other features. www.rotarycluboflamirada.com if you want to check it out.

We were already hosting our old 1990's-era website (oh! the horror!!) through GoDaddy, so I just left that alone. That's something like $60 a year. Weebly can do the hosting also.

Good luck!


"Of all the world's bassists, I'm one of them!" - Lug
Re: Web Site Design [Re: Bob Gollihur] #2745706 01/09/16 01:48 AM
Joined: Jul 2008
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J. Dead Offline
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Originally Posted By: Bob Gollihur
Originally Posted By: J. Dan
I might have misunderstood your intent. I had the idea you wanted to learn a bit about web site development along the way.

If you just want the easiest, cheapest route to getting a single page out there that you don't intend to touch again (or very often), then there are lots of site builder tools out there. Many of the hosting companies offer a sitebuilder app of their own. When you evaluate hosting options, check their features - many offer this.

But I think the main intent of my post was lost. That is, you need to understand what you don't know. If it's just a splash page for people to see, that's one thing. But if you're going to need to continuously update it with things like calendar updates, news releases, pictures, videos, etc., then you're going to make sure that it's easy to update.

So let's back up just a little with this in mind.

First, you don't need any software to make a web page if you at least know HTML and preferably CSS. It's very easy, actually, and you can just type it in a text editor like Notepad and save it as a .html file. That's not the hard part. The hard part is having a good design in the first place that is visually appealing, not cheesy, easy to navigate, and a good experience for the visitor. That has nothing to do with knowing HTML, or using a sitebuilder app, but about being creative and following some basic guidelines about web design. And again, no matter what you use, some photo editing skills are extremely helpful not just for actual photos, but any other images you may wish to incorporate, not to mention understanding color scheme and other visual effects.

The site builder apps as well as some other development tools are called WYSIWYG (What You See Is What You Get) because you design it visually, and it generates to code to put on your site. The problem is that it has to accommodate anything anybody may come up with and publish it in a way that's compatible with a variety of browsers on various devices. So it's going to generate the code in a systematic way that may result in multiple files, subfolders, long code with randomly generated names and id's, that's next to impossible to follow if you look at the code itself. What this means, is that in order to edit one small thing on a page, you may have to go back to the app it was created in, edit it there, and regenerate the entire page, or entire site just for that small change. Where as if you wrote simple well formed HTML to begin with, it's really easy to just go right to the section that needs to be updated and do it.

My preference is kind of in the middle. I have software that allows you to kind of do both. You have one pane that shows the code and another that shows a preview. You can insert things and edit things either way. I still mostly go by the code, but with this software (and just about any designed for web design), it uses Intellisense. That's simply a color coding of the code you type so that it's really easy to spot any errors and differentiate the code from the content. In Internet Explorer, if you right-click on a page and select "view source", it shows the HTML this way.

Again, this all comes down to how much you want to customize it and how much you'll need to update it.


Which tool are you using, and are you aware of any lower priced versions? wink

I rolled my own back in the day, but then for years relied on Homesite for its shortcut buttons and quick preview function. It was bought out and later abandoned, and I'd love to put my hands on a replacement. TNX!



Some years back when I was married, my ex wife was a teacher so I got the educator discount on Adobe CS3 suite - which I needed for a number of different applications like acrobat pro, Photoshop, and illustrator (plus back then I was doing some flash), so I've gotten accustomed to Dreamweaver.


Dan

Acoustic/Electric stringed instruments ranging from 4 to 230 strings, hammered, picked, fingered, slapped, and plucked. Analog and Digital Electronic instruments, reeds, and throat/mouth.
Re: Web Site Design [Re: J. Dead] #2747510 01/17/16 08:21 PM
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Juancarlin Offline
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After spending years dealing with html editors, WYSIWYG programs and the such, I've resorted several years ago to Apple's iWeb. Starting from several templates you can add or modify things as you wish, and for a simple, no frills website I think it's more than enough. Only thing you have to run it on a Mac (Or a Hackintosh, for that matter). My own website as an example. www.juancarlin.com.ve

Re: Web Site Design [Re: Juancarlin] #2751765 02/01/16 01:16 AM
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J. Dead Offline
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Do you host it on your own server? I don't tend to see a lot of hosting services offering Mac OS.


Dan

Acoustic/Electric stringed instruments ranging from 4 to 230 strings, hammered, picked, fingered, slapped, and plucked. Analog and Digital Electronic instruments, reeds, and throat/mouth.
Re: Web Site Design [Re: J. Dead] #2752891 02/05/16 02:21 AM
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zeronyne Offline
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As someone who does this for a living at the corporate level:

For your requirements, use Wordpress. If you want to take it further, great. But start with Wordpress. It's free, you can install it on any server with little fuss. Your site will just work on phone and desktop, and you can use it as a blog as well as a site.

I see so many personal pages look like they are from the 1990s unnecessarily. If you need more information, let me know.


"For instance" is not proof.

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