Music Player Network Home Guitar Player Magazine Keyboard Magazine Bass Player Magazine EQ Magazine
Page 1 of 2 1 2 >
Topic Options
#2415367 - 05/29/12 05:54 AM Demo recording - help & feedback
Mikeportnoyz Offline
Member

Registered: 05/29/12
Posts: 12
I recently recorded an EP for a symphonic metal group.
Could you give me son feedback on it, maybe some help? What would you modify, what would you change?
Equipment used was very, very seriously cheap (about 800 euro summing everything, INCLUDING the pc, bought used) but i think the result is not too bad. Something weird goes on with the bass, it sounds good in a car but bad on pc, they don't seem to have ANY punch whatsoever, and at this point i don't really know what to do about it.
Youtube also lost about a 10% of quality, but not too much.

Youtube

Equipment used:
HP compaq nc8430
Motu 8pre
Shure SM58
Shure PG58
Samson C01
2xSamson C03

Software: Sonar 8.5
Plugins: SONITUS and stimwell majortom

Please do not comment on youtube for technical issues, the band is not responsible for them.

Top
#2415377 - 05/29/12 07:01 AM Re: Demo recording - help & feedback [Re: Mikeportnoyz]
Griffinator Moderator Offline
TPS cook & bottle washer
20k Club

Registered: 03/28/02
Posts: 20318
Loc: Lynchburg, VA, USA
I can't give you feedback on the recording of a track that was converted into an MP3 and then re-compressed into video format then re-compressed again when YT changed your mpeg into a flash video. There just isn't enough there.

Regarding your issue with the bass, I can tell you without listening to the track that car stereos are designed to exaggerate bass, and PC speakers (without subs) can barely reproduce low frequencies at all. Hence your problem - there isn't enough low midrange representation of the bass.

Top
#2415380 - 05/29/12 07:18 AM Re: Demo recording - help & feedback [Re: Mikeportnoyz]
audiofreek Offline
Gold Member

Registered: 05/09/01
Posts: 782
Loc: Prince George,CANADA
What did you monitor the mix on?It seemed like the vocals were getting lost in the mix at times,and sounded quite thin.keep in mind I just listened on my laptop with a headset,and it the mix did sound bass lite,but overall,drums guitar and keys fit well together.
The bass not transfering well to different listening sources is a common problem associated to monitoring and the acoustics of the mix room.
If you want bass energy to come forward on computer speakers,you would have to focus more in the mid bass area.If you dial in a deep bottom,it will be lost on a small set os computer speakers.I hate this compromise myself,but in this Youtube world it's a reality.

Top
#2415390 - 05/29/12 08:42 AM Re: Demo recording - help & feedback [Re: audiofreek]
Griffinator Moderator Offline
TPS cook & bottle washer
20k Club

Registered: 03/28/02
Posts: 20318
Loc: Lynchburg, VA, USA
Originally Posted By: audiofreek
What did you monitor the mix on?It seemed like the vocals were getting lost in the mix at times,and sounded quite thin.


I went and spun it on my hifi system - the vocals actually walk all over the rest of the mix during the verse. You're probably getting the "wide double" effect on your headset, where the vocal doesn't sound as present being dead center and surrounded by the rest of the instruments.

Top
#2415525 - 05/29/12 08:39 PM Re: Demo recording - help & feedback [Re: Griffinator]
audiofreek Offline
Gold Member

Registered: 05/09/01
Posts: 782
Loc: Prince George,CANADA
Yeah,I listened to it on the laptops teenie weenie speakers,and the vocal level seemed Ok.No bass though(big surprise there).


Edited by audiofreek (05/29/12 08:39 PM)

Top
#2415779 - 05/31/12 01:04 AM Re: Demo recording - help & feedback [Re: audiofreek]
Mikeportnoyz Offline
Member

Registered: 05/29/12
Posts: 12
Well the track is not compressed THREE times, but just one, i uploaded a video with uncompressed audio, so youtube made just one compression. Of course i assume you didn't listen it on 240p but on 360p at least, the quality goes reaaaly bad on 240p.
I used an AIWA stereo hi-fi to monitor. They are not monitors of any kind, but as a hi-fi is probable the most neutral i ever heard. Of course, it has NO subwoofer, so i have nothing to monitor anything that goes below 200hz or around there.

I tried using the midrange-bass to give emphasis, but it seems like the bass has none (probably bad eq of the amp during recording?), and the guitar just sounds fat if those bass are increased.
The vocals sound just perfect on my stereo, but i guess they do not on other listening devices. Here they never get lost and are always on top of everything, tough they get a little weaker, now and then.

Track was recorded (my huge mistake) at 44100 hz and 16bit. I mixed it at 44.1 and 16 and didn't like it at all, i remixed it weeks later at 96 khz and 32 bits and what you heard is the result.

Top
#2415786 - 05/31/12 03:20 AM Re: Demo recording - help & feedback [Re: Mikeportnoyz]
Griffinator Moderator Offline
TPS cook & bottle washer
20k Club

Registered: 03/28/02
Posts: 20318
Loc: Lynchburg, VA, USA
Originally Posted By: Mikeportnoyz
I used an AIWA stereo hi-fi to monitor. They are not monitors of any kind, but as a hi-fi is probable the most neutral i ever heard. Of course, it has NO subwoofer, so i have nothing to monitor anything that goes below 200hz or around there.


(emphasis mine)

Wow, 200 Hz? That's a lot of LF info to lose... Normally I say it's more important to know and understand your monitoring system than it is to have "studio" monitors, but if your speakers are quitting on you at 200 Hz, you're not hearing the bass at all. Even the hifi system I was listening on (Onkyo amp and preamp connected to a pair of Infinity 2-way reference speaks) delivers down to 60Hz before it drops off.

Quote:
I tried using the midrange-bass to give emphasis, but it seems like the bass has none (probably bad eq of the amp during recording?), and the guitar just sounds fat if those bass are increased.


You need to go back to the mix and emphasize the mid-bass on the actual bass track. Bumping it in the entire mix, yeah, those guitars are going to just dominate the bass even more.

Quote:
The vocals sound just perfect on my stereo, but i guess they do not on other listening devices. Here they never get lost and are always on top of everything, tough they get a little weaker, now and then.


I found them overpowering during the first verse. I would have rode the fader a bit on her and added a bit of 4K to give her some air and keep her strongly present in that sweet spot between the top of the guitars and the bottom of the cymbals, so she had her own sonic space.

Top
#2415790 - 05/31/12 04:00 AM Re: Demo recording - help & feedback [Re: Griffinator]
Mikeportnoyz Offline
Member

Registered: 05/29/12
Posts: 12
Well of course the stereo goes down to 60-40hz and you can listen those frequency ranges, but i'm pretty sure it's at least 12 db off at about 100 hz, or something like that.
Yes, i meant that i tried increasing midrange bass frequency on the bass instrument, but couldn't find any to begin with, i mean there was barely anything above 500hz. What exact frequence would you suggest to increase?

And ya increasing 4khz on voice should be a good idea, i'll give it a try. I increased about 1.5 db around 3khz with a wide Q, if i increased more it kind of became too bright.
(with rode you mean increase? I'm italian)

What about the other instruments?


Edited by Mikeportnoyz (05/31/12 04:01 AM)

Top
#2415798 - 05/31/12 05:34 AM Re: Demo recording - help & feedback [Re: Mikeportnoyz]
Griffinator Moderator Offline
TPS cook & bottle washer
20k Club

Registered: 03/28/02
Posts: 20318
Loc: Lynchburg, VA, USA
Originally Posted By: Mikeportnoyz
Well of course the stereo goes down to 60-40hz and you can listen those frequency ranges, but i'm pretty sure it's at least 12 db off at about 100 hz, or something like that.
Yes, i meant that i tried increasing midrange bass frequency on the bass instrument, but couldn't find any to begin with, i mean there was barely anything above 500hz. What exact frequence would you suggest to increase?


The real "presence" frequency for the bass is right around 200hz.

Quote:
And ya increasing 4khz on voice should be a good idea, i'll give it a try. I increased about 1.5 db around 3khz with a wide Q, if i increased more it kind of became too bright.
(with rode you mean increase? I'm italian)


"Ride the fader" is an old-school term. Back before track automation, when one would mix an uneven vocal, they would "ride the fader" - adjusting the volume manually up and down during the mix session to compensate for the variance in volume of the recorded vocal track. Your singer is really loud in some passages and not so much in others, and I'd suggest using some automation (instead of a compressor) to bring the volume back down in the louder passages, then using that 4K boost to bring presence back.

Quote:
What about the other instruments?


Guitar/keys/drums all sounded fine.

Top
#2415829 - 05/31/12 07:08 AM Re: Demo recording - help & feedback [Re: Griffinator]
Mikeportnoyz Offline
Member

Registered: 05/29/12
Posts: 12
Thank you for the info, i've been asking myself all kinds of questions on those vocals... i tried to compress them, i used automation to change levels on some points but i thought i was going the wrong way and that probably in studios they just used better compressors than mine. Automating everything seemed too tedious, but now i understand it is just the normal thing to do. I suppose the main problem is at the source: the C01 requires the singers to stand pretty close for decent recording, making the smallest of variations in distance result in huge variations of levels.

Top
#2418178 - 06/10/12 09:13 PM Re: Demo recording - help & feedback [Re: Mikeportnoyz]
Perkunas Offline
Senior Member

Registered: 02/28/12
Posts: 75
Lot's of good suggestions above so I will be a little more general in my comment.
Maybe start your mix with the vocal track. Get rid of anything below 200/300hz on the track. (This clears space for other instruments). Look for "air" at 4k as mentioned and also 8 to 10k. Don't do anything else till you feel you have a "good" sounding and even vocal.
Then add the kik. Rule of thumb is 80hz, then look for the click sound somewhere between 2.5 and 5k. Reducing 300 to 600 cuts back on the "cardboard" sound. If you know your room and your monitors you don't need "professional" monitors.
Slowly add the drums and bass, paying special attention to the interplay between the kik and the bass.

As suggested above you are searching for that "low mid" frequency that allows low end instruments to be discerned on cheaper gear and things such as laptops.

Now add your guitars etc last, remembering to get rid of all frequencies below what the guitarist plays. (e.g. if a guitarist plays a solo where the lowest note is 440hz...then clear out everything below that...it will only be amp and pickup hum below that frequency, which clouds the mix.)

The big trick here is to listen to your mix as you go, on as many devices as you can muster. Hifi, laptop, car, headphones and portable cd player to name some.

I note your reference to "studios". Yes they have better gear but it is still operated by humans. Given that I don't know what you have tracked in the first place, think of it like this; a mix is a journey from A to B. You can do the journey in a Ferrari, on bicycle or on foot. If you have cheap equipment you are on foot but you can still get there as long as you are patient. (A Ferrari can still get lost.)

Cheers and good luck.

Top
#2418183 - 06/10/12 09:33 PM Re: Demo recording - help & feedback [Re: Mikeportnoyz]
Griffinator Moderator Offline
TPS cook & bottle washer
20k Club

Registered: 03/28/02
Posts: 20318
Loc: Lynchburg, VA, USA
Originally Posted By: Mikeportnoyz
i used automation to change levels on some points but i thought i was going the wrong way and that probably in studios they just used better compressors than mine. Automating everything seemed too tedious, but now i understand it is just the normal thing to do.


If it's wildly inconsistent (I get the impression it is, if you have a compressor strapped down and it's still as up-and-down as what I'm hearing), you can always "normalize" the vocal track (in an external editor if necessary, depending on your DAW) before you mix. It won't eliminate your automation process, but it will make it a lot easier.

Top
#2418184 - 06/10/12 09:41 PM Re: Demo recording - help & feedback [Re: Perkunas]
Griffinator Moderator Offline
TPS cook & bottle washer
20k Club

Registered: 03/28/02
Posts: 20318
Loc: Lynchburg, VA, USA
I was right with you until here.

Originally Posted By: Perkunas
The big trick here is to listen to your mix as you go, on as many devices as you can muster. Hifi, laptop, car, headphones and portable cd player to name some.


I vehemently disagree. The biggest key to successful mixing is to know your monitors. Rather than spending hours upon hours upon hours listening to every stage of each mix on a dozen different playback systems, spend a couple of days when you first get your monitors listening to recorded music with which you are intimately familiar. My personal listening list when I'm getting to know a pair of monitors usually consists of:

Angel Dust - Faith No More
Master of Puppets - Metallica
Little Queen - Heart
Shine On Brightly - Procol Harum
The Magician's Birthday - Uriah Heep
Ship Arriving Too Late To Save A Drowning Witch - Frank Zappa

Each of these records has a very, very unique overall tone to them, and each has a distinctly different instrument combination that gives me angles on how a pair of speakers responds to just about any instrument I'm likely to encounter in a recording session, from horn sections to noise samples and everything in between.

PS: I love the analogy of a mix being a journey. I've been on more than a few such journeys where the Ferrari wasn't going to get me over the rickety footbridge in front of me and I had to get out and walk anyway! thu

Top
#2418185 - 06/10/12 09:50 PM Re: Demo recording - help & feedback [Re: Mikeportnoyz]
Perkunas Offline
Senior Member

Registered: 02/28/12
Posts: 75
Here's a little hint after reading your post about going for a 1.5db increase at 3k with a wide Q. I'm guessing that you are limited as far EQ power goes.

So, why not clone the vocal track a couple of times?

Now treat small sections of your track with the available EQ and cut everything below as required.

Theoretically, you could add, say reverb to a small section of your vocal but not the rest. As you have 3 identical vocal tracks but each treated differently, you will also be able to place them in different spots in the mix to get some interesting effects.

This also allows you to use tight Q as you have increased your EQ power.

You could make her sound like a "choir" if you think about it.

Cheers

Top
#2418194 - 06/10/12 11:29 PM Re: Demo recording - help & feedback [Re: Griffinator]
Perkunas Offline
Senior Member

Registered: 02/28/12
Posts: 75
Griffinator,
I VEHEMENTLY AGREE with you.
My advice is for a person who does not know their monitors.
Another road, same destination.

This may be OT, but I am interested in your reference songs.

How did you arrive at them?
I haven't heard the Frank Zappa one but, out of curiosity, is that the album where he wrote melodies using the concept of the "missing fundamental"?

Cheers

Top
#2418248 - 06/11/12 07:15 AM Re: Demo recording - help & feedback [Re: Perkunas]
Mikeportnoyz Offline
Member

Registered: 05/29/12
Posts: 12
I'm sad that nobody noticed, but the vocal tracks ARE cloned. Well, more than cloned, they've been recorded twice, and the second (good) take, goes with less dB than the first (good) take.
It's done on both voices, on all the duration of the track.

I think i know my monitors, i just forgot that they have very poor bass and that fucked up my perceptions on the lows... also, 50hz on kick? Wouldn't that sound bassy only with huge concert amplification systems? wouldn't it be better to stay on 100-200, tough it would be same frequency of the bass?

Liked the poetry there about the travel, i know lots of people here who go around withouth a ferrari. But let me say, my equipment was more or less like having to walk on your hands, more than "on foot". Sum up everything i use (notebook included) and it's still less value than one macbook

Top
#2418251 - 06/11/12 07:23 AM Re: Demo recording - help & feedback [Re: Perkunas]
Griffinator Moderator Offline
TPS cook & bottle washer
20k Club

Registered: 03/28/02
Posts: 20318
Loc: Lynchburg, VA, USA
Originally Posted By: Perkunas
Griffinator,
I VEHEMENTLY AGREE with you.
My advice is for a person who does not know their monitors.
Another road, same destination.

This may be OT, but I am interested in your reference songs.

How did you arrive at them?
I haven't heard the Frank Zappa one but, out of curiosity, is that the album where he wrote melodies using the concept of the "missing fundamental"?

Cheers


I guess my point was that someone who doesn't know their monitors would be well-served to invest time in learning them, rather than going through the arduous task of testing their mixes hundreds of times during the process. smile

As to my reference list:

Angle Dust and Master of Puppets were albums I literally grew up listening to - the former I've worn out a dozen copies since its release date in '90, the latter probably fifteen or twenty since 1985. In short, I know these albums in my sleep, and I know exactly how they sound - which makes the transition to a fresh pair of speakers very quick as I adjust to how those speakers make them sound.

Little Queen became a go-to because of its wide dynamic and stylistic spread, not to mention a pinnacle of female vocal performance (and capture) in the rock context. If I know I'm going to be tracking a female vocalist, there's no better record (to me) to prep myself on the monitors I'm using.

Shine On Brightly and The Magician's Birthday were just really great mixed-format rock albums, with prominent organ and keys in long-form compositions ("In Held Twas In I" on the former, the title track on the latter), though the approaches were dramatically different in production on one versus the other, which provides some different perspectives on how the organ particularly sounds on the given speakers.

Finally, Ship Arriving is a terrible sounding record, and deliberately so. All one needs is a cursory review of the liner notes where Frank goes into great detail about what sort of gear one should use to listen to the thing (something he never did on any other record), and his intentions suddenly become clear.

How terrible? I visited the Klipsch headquarters in Indy back in 2004 on an invite tour, and a bunch of other folks who came for the tour set up a listening system in the conference room at the hotel where we all stayed. It was comprised of a $6000 turntable, a $4000 tube preamp, a $7000 pair of tube monoblocks, and a pair of Klipsch LaScalas. People were relaxing and enjoying Blue Note jazz records, marveling at the sound of the system as classic Yes and Rush albums spun...

Then I put that record on and cleared the room in less than two minutes. By the time the first strains of "Valley Girl" began, there were three of us left, all Zappa fans, all laughing hysterically at the supreme practical joke I had just executed on a bunch of hoity-toity audiophiles.

Back on point - that record has an absolutely unique sound that gives me an entirely different reference point for a pair of speakers - whether they are capable of being HONEST as they reproduce the source material. If that record sounds good on your system, your speakers are lying to you.

Top
#2418258 - 06/11/12 07:49 AM Re: Demo recording - help & feedback [Re: Griffinator]
Mikeportnoyz Offline
Member

Registered: 05/29/12
Posts: 12
Now that i think about it, i usually do the same to understand system response, and try to get to know the laptop/car/etc i'm listening too.
But my reference are mostly
Dark side of the moon
Some yes albums
Some dream theater albums (older and newest, they sound really different)

And generally all stuff i listened for a lifetime

Top
#2418506 - 06/11/12 09:22 PM Re: Demo recording - help & feedback [Re: Mikeportnoyz]
Perkunas Offline
Senior Member

Registered: 02/28/12
Posts: 75
Don't be sad as I was not referring to your tracking or "doubling" of the vocals.

What I was referring to was a method of increasing EQ power in a cheaper system. A clone is an exact copy of a track to another track. Let's say you have access to only one 3 band parametric EQ per track. Once you have cloned you would have access to two 3 band parametric EQ's.

On the original track concentrate the EQ into say, the 300 to 600 range. On the cloned track concentrate the EQ into the 600 to 2k zone. etc. etc according to how many times you have cloned. Essentially you are taking the advantage of the Q factor (bandwidth) which is only available as a "mid frequency" on cheaper units.

Yes, this is a bit like walking on your hands but it can work and gives some interesting results if you play with the pan.

So I wasn't talking about your "takes". I was looking at how to increase your Q power.

Cheers

Top
#2418518 - 06/11/12 09:42 PM Re: Demo recording - help & feedback [Re: Mikeportnoyz]
Perkunas Offline
Senior Member

Registered: 02/28/12
Posts: 75
Mmmmmm, I think there may be a misreading in regard to to the Kik drum frequency. The "general rule" is 80hz (not 50) for the kik and 120 for the Bass. Then look for harmonic punch from 1.5k to 2k for the bass and 2.5k to 5k for the "click" on the kik.

I noticed that you referred to "Yes" as a reference. 90125 and Big generator are great studio reference albums.

If I may be cheeky please listen to "Heartbeat", track 2 on King Crimson's "Beat" album. The bottom end treatment there is a textbook.

Cheers


Edited by Perkunas (06/11/12 09:43 PM)

Top
#2418527 - 06/11/12 11:37 PM Re: Demo recording - help & feedback [Re: Griffinator]
Perkunas Offline
Senior Member

Registered: 02/28/12
Posts: 75
Mr. Griffinator,
I doffs me hat to ya.
Anyone who can clear a room within two minutes using only a Frank Zappa album as ammo...what's there left to say?

Seriously, I think this might be my "lost chord" album. I have been aware that Zappa did a "missing fundamental" track. Google searching revealed nothing, but your description seems to fit the bill.

I will have to buy the ? vinyl, ? Cd?. What is your recommendation?

Cheers

Top
#2418685 - 06/12/12 12:45 PM Re: Demo recording - help & feedback [Re: Perkunas]
Griffinator Moderator Offline
TPS cook & bottle washer
20k Club

Registered: 03/28/02
Posts: 20318
Loc: Lynchburg, VA, USA
Originally Posted By: Perkunas
Mr. Griffinator,
I doffs me hat to ya.
Anyone who can clear a room within two minutes using only a Frank Zappa album as ammo...what's there left to say?

Seriously, I think this might be my "lost chord" album. I have been aware that Zappa did a "missing fundamental" track. Google searching revealed nothing, but your description seems to fit the bill.

I will have to buy the ? vinyl, ? Cd?. What is your recommendation?

Cheers


I own the vinyl, and I've ripped the vinyl straight to 320K for portability. I've never cross-referenced to the CD, but I suspect Ryko probably re-treated it, so it wouldn't be nearly as effective...

Regarding the "missing fundamental", I'm going to stick my neck out and say "I Come From Nowhere" is the track you're after.

Song starts at 0:54


Top
#2425440 - 07/13/12 08:38 AM Re: Demo recording - help & feedback [Re: Griffinator]
Mikeportnoyz Offline
Member

Registered: 05/29/12
Posts: 12
Not sure what you just showed me here, anyways... I'm still working on new songs, and i finally approached mastering. I did it before, but the plugins i used weren't doing the job, and i realized that as soon as i found one that actually DOES what it should be (brick wall limiter that actually brick wall limits.)

The songs now sound much smoother, much more cleaner, and like the audio definition got up a few notches. Almost like it was recorded with better microphones? But one thing i notice... at high volumes, the songs now seem to cause headache. Any idea why and how?
I'm using LP64 Multiband compressor followed by a Boost11 and in the end, 3db of soft clip with Event Horizon

Just 3 db of gain on each limiter and the songs sound completely different, i'm amazed... but still why the ear-head hurting _

Top
#2425449 - 07/13/12 09:02 AM Re: Demo recording - help & feedback [Re: Mikeportnoyz]
Griffinator Moderator Offline
TPS cook & bottle washer
20k Club

Registered: 03/28/02
Posts: 20318
Loc: Lynchburg, VA, USA
Originally Posted By: Mikeportnoyz
Not sure what you just showed me here, anyways... I'm still working on new songs, and i finally approached mastering. I did it before, but the plugins i used weren't doing the job, and i realized that as soon as i found one that actually DOES what it should be (brick wall limiter that actually brick wall limits.)

The songs now sound much smoother, much more cleaner, and like the audio definition got up a few notches. Almost like it was recorded with better microphones? But one thing i notice... at high volumes, the songs now seem to cause headache. Any idea why and how?
I'm using LP64 Multiband compressor followed by a Boost11 and in the end, 3db of soft clip with Event Horizon

Just 3 db of gain on each limiter and the songs sound completely different, i'm amazed... but still why the ear-head hurting _


You just discovered the other edge of the sword known as loudness...

By compressing the dynamics out of the song, you create ear fatigue as the overall levels remain constant instead of varying. This in turn gives you a headache when you listen to it at high volumes.

Top
#2425596 - 07/13/12 11:20 PM Re: Demo recording - help & feedback [Re: Griffinator]
Mikeportnoyz Offline
Member

Registered: 05/29/12
Posts: 12
Loool i will have to study about that, very interesting!
Can you give me any more technical detail about that, somewhere to look for/make reearch?

So this is why Pink floyd sound Awesome (with capital A) at high volumes and classic heavy metal gives headaches?

Top
#2425615 - 07/14/12 05:28 AM Re: Demo recording - help & feedback [Re: Mikeportnoyz]
Griffinator Moderator Offline
TPS cook & bottle washer
20k Club

Registered: 03/28/02
Posts: 20318
Loc: Lynchburg, VA, USA
Classic heavy metal isn't compressed to death, but some of those early 80's metal records were pretty mid-rangy and heavy on the verb, so...

Top
#2425652 - 07/14/12 09:05 AM Re: Demo recording - help & feedback [Re: Griffinator]
Mikeportnoyz Offline
Member

Registered: 05/29/12
Posts: 12
Can you give me any more technical detail about that, somewhere to look for/make research?
Seems way too interesting to not get deeper
Even just the name of the thing might be useful


Edited by Mikeportnoyz (07/14/12 09:08 AM)

Top
#2431631 - 08/13/12 08:23 AM Re: Demo recording - help & feedback [Re: Mikeportnoyz]
Mikeportnoyz Offline
Member

Registered: 05/29/12
Posts: 12
Hello? Anybody? XD

Top
#2431637 - 08/13/12 08:40 AM Re: Demo recording - help & feedback [Re: Mikeportnoyz]
Griffinator Moderator Offline
TPS cook & bottle washer
20k Club

Registered: 03/28/02
Posts: 20318
Loc: Lynchburg, VA, USA
Originally Posted By: Mikeportnoyz
Can you give me any more technical detail about that, somewhere to look for/make research?
Seems way too interesting to not get deeper
Even just the name of the thing might be useful


Great examples of early 80's metal production value:

Twisted Sister - You Can't Stop Rock And Roll
Motley Crue - Too Fast For Love

Top
#2431638 - 08/13/12 08:46 AM Re: Demo recording - help & feedback [Re: Griffinator]
Mikeportnoyz Offline
Member

Registered: 05/29/12
Posts: 12
No no misunderstanding i meant to make reasearch about this, the ear fatigue thing
"You just discovered the other edge of the sword known as loudness..."

Top
Page 1 of 2 1 2 >


Moderator:  Griffinator, Griffinator