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#2292802 - 04/16/11 09:36 AM Doubling on Bass Guitar and Acoustic Bass
johngoldsby Offline
Senior Member

Registered: 02/28/09
Posts: 216
Loc: Cologne, Germany
A question to all electric/upright doublers...

I'm curious: What is the most fun, or most satisfying thing about playing both acoustic and electric bass? What are the major problems? Fingering and technique issues? Amplification problems? Do you double on gigs? If so, what kind of equipment setup do you use to easily switch between both instruments?

I'm doing a series of articles for Bass Player on this topic. If anyone has thoughts, feel free to chime in . . . I could use your feedback.
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#2292811 - 04/16/11 10:13 AM Re: Doubling on Bass Guitar and Acoustic Bass [Re: johngoldsby]
Stewthebassman Offline
Member

Registered: 04/16/11
Posts: 1
Hi John, I have played electric and gigged on it for years.

Started URB 10 years ago when daughter #1 was born. I have gigged a lot with both now, but rarely if ever at the same time.
I loved learning URB because it got me away from always trying to sound/play like Jaco. Hard habit to break. It also made me rethink note selection and my approach to the fingerboard, which was a huge boon to my playing.

So essentially the URB improved me tremendously. I have a Phil Jones Flightcase which is perfect for small URB gigs. Still have my GK/Hartke setup from my rock/wedding band/country days that I use for electric or URB in bigger rooms.

When I go to a Big Band practice I'll take my fretless electric. Too many contemporary songs that I can't play on my URB and it's too much of a pain to bring both basses. Big Band gigs are electric only. My one BB gig where I took the Upright was a sonic disaster....so that was that!

So yeah, I have stopped trying to play like Jaco, thank goodness, let the poor man rest in peace!

Nice to be able to talk about being a switch hitter, double threat! My ultimate gig would be for a Musical Pit, both instruments all the time...now that would stretch the technique!

Peace!

Stew

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#2292817 - 04/16/11 10:52 AM Re: Doubling on Bass Guitar and Acoustic Bass [Re: Stewthebassman]
Cthulhu Fhtagn Offline
MP Hall of Fame Member

Registered: 11/21/03
Posts: 4131
Loc: Eastern Washington
J,

Play both. Electric (Fender P) in a classic rock band, and an EUB/URB in a classic jazz project.

Electrics kinda speak for themselves. I hold bottom in a classic rock/blues rock/originals band. I don't have a lot of vocal duties, so I get to hang back, bounce around, screw with the dummer and interact with the dancers. I have fun and it's a gas, but there are 50 more bassist in this town that just as good or better than me. After the gig, they come up to the bandleader and say "you guys were great".

The biggest pain with the URB is getting it from point A to point B. My last vehicle choice was bassed on getting the URB into it along with my PA (Honda Oddesey, by the way).

I use a NS WAV 4 for practices and rehersals because I can fit it in my Toyota. $900 for an entry level NS, another $150 for the endpin attachment (playing on a tripod sucks), $200 for strings that DON'T sound like a guitar. The neck, scale length and radius are identical to a 3/4, so the transistion isn't a problem.

Live sound is a pain. The URB needs to be miked up and I run though a PA (we are a mostly small venue group; hauling in the G-K doesn't work). There's the commensurate sound check issues and those rare occasions where I spin the bass and knock the mic and mic stand over. Exciting everytime it's tried. I figure to set myself up with a mounted mic or pups and a wireless will set me back another $200.

Enough bitching - there is a certain sound, a tone, a projection you CAN'T get with electric. It's warm, soft, fuzzy, familiar. That dull, percussive thump is a heartbeat that is as tangible as it is audible drives the rest of the band. It is the high-maintenance girlfriend that causes you worry and fret, but the love-making is incredible! No one makes a pedal that replicates that sound. No manufacturer makes a bass guitar that has that feel. The presence on stage is like having another band member; everyone remembers the upright. I haul the coffin into the venue and everyone stops what they're doing and watches. Even the younger people have a facination with the instrument. At the end of the gig, people come up to me and ask "That's a beautiful instrument. How long did it take you to learn to play?" I am now one of two or three that ply that craft.

I don't mix the two between the bands. The instrument is perfecly suited for each and switching them out doesn't really net me much. Since I run a wireless typically, I can turn off the transmitter and plug into the next instrument quite easily - if I had to. My G-K footswitch allows me to quickly go from the "guitar" tone to the "upright" tone in less time than it takes for the guitars to go from electric to acoustic during a set.

If I had to pick one band, I'd stay with the Classic Rock project. Larger venues, the dancers, the audiance interaction is more gratifying than the "wine, cheese and coffee" crowd of the small venue jazz project. But I would still find the time weekly to spend time with the doghouse.
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#2292850 - 04/16/11 12:26 PM Re: Doubling on Bass Guitar and Acoustic Bass [Re: johngoldsby]
Oliver Sampson Offline
Member

Registered: 05/06/05
Posts: 4
I play fretted, fretless and EUB. The reason for playing the different instruments is, of course, for the different tones. I very much would like to buy a proper URB, but the cost is a problem, as well as transporting it to and from the gig. Transporting my EUB is enough of a problem!

I'm still missing the one sound that I think only a real URB can give me and that's a good arco tone. The EUB (an Aria SWB-Alpha) has a pizzicato sound that lands somewhere between an upright and a fretless, which for acoustic Rock kinds of gigs is really good, but in my opinion only "acceptable" for Jazz gigs.

Switching between the two instruments during a gig has never really been a problem, but learning URB after learning electric bass was a challenge. The different fingerings, the different techniques for the right and left hands compared to electric bass, and the degree of ear-training required to play a fretless instrument were all big hurdles at the beginning. However, once I got to the point where I could play the URB in public, actually switching between the instruments was never a problem. After all, it's about the music, and the tools are just there to play the music. If my playing and musicality had revolved solely around the instrument, then I'm sure switching would be more difficult.

Thinking about the music of it all is something which is very important. The URB, by it's nature (lack of frets) forces a type of musicality that one doesn't necessarily need when playing a fretted electric bass. I've had plenty of players as students who work from a musical knowledge based nothing more than fretboard roadmaps, which is very limiting after a certain point. The URB forces a knowledge of note names, intervals and specific scalar relationships that are easy to skip over with the grid-based view of a fretted instrument.
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#2292853 - 04/16/11 12:37 PM Re: Doubling on Bass Guitar and Acoustic Bass [Re: johngoldsby]
brow6ej Offline
Member

Registered: 04/16/11
Posts: 1
Hi John,

I am a classically trained double bassist who has recently formed a rock band, playing electric bass.

I thought the transition from upright (which I've been playing most of my life) to electric (which I've always owned but barely touched) would be easy, but it hasn't been. I ran into several problems immediately, and I now regard the electric bass as a completely different instrument demanding a new approach and a different set of musical skills.

The first obstacle for me was dealing with frets. Muscle memory as a classical bassist has allowed me to look up at my music and the conductor and simultaneously throw my finger onto any note with ease. On electric I am constantly looking down to see if my fingers are where they are supposed to be on the fret. Maybe part of this has to do with margin of error... maybe I am more comfortable on a fretless fingerboard because approximate pitch is "good enough" for me, as opposed to the black/white, right/wrong element that frets create.

This leads me to my next point... I constantly sound out of tune when on electric. I've realized that no matter how well we tune up before a gig, my instrument does not completely line up with the guitar and keyboard on certain notes. In an orchestra, string players have the ability to nudge their fingers fractions of millimeters to be perfectly in tune with the rest of the orchestra. At a rock gig, you're stuck with the imperfections of an equal-tempered system.

It has taken me years and years to develop dynamic control of my upright with my bow hand. I can't say that dynamic control on electric is harder, but it is a completely different skill to develop. Being the one-man bass section in my band (as opposed to a 5-person bass section in an orchestra) makes dynamics even more crucial, and it requires me to put a lot more energy and focus on the sound I am creating.

I can say that playing the electric bass has improved my approach on double bass. The intimacy nature of a 4-piece rock band has opened my ears to my musicality in ways that are forgotten when blended in with a big ensemble. My consistency of tone, consistency of rhythm, my dynamic approach, and my interaction with other musicians have improved since playing in my band. I've learned that electric bass requires some serious practice on its own, but most importantly I've learned how to expand my musical depth and grow as a performer.

-Eric
(Twitter username: brow6ej)

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#2292869 - 04/16/11 01:40 PM Re: Doubling on Bass Guitar and Acoustic Bass [Re: brow6ej]
johngoldsby Offline
Senior Member

Registered: 02/28/09
Posts: 216
Loc: Cologne, Germany
It's interesting to see where everyone is coming from. I started on electric in the '70s, and picked up URB a couple of years later. When things got more serious musically, I started playing only URB -- it fit with the music I was pursuing. I left the electric in the closet for many years, until I started playing electric again about 16 years ago, when I got a gig that required both.

When I need to use both instruments, I use a Little Lehle A/B switcher to go between two channels of a Glockenklang Bassart amp.

I think the main requirement for playing either instrument authentically is to have an aural image of whatever music is being played. If I know what something is supposed to sound like, I can go for that sound on either instrument . . . rock or funk on electric . . . swing or playing with the bow on acoustic.

My first article in this series for Bass Player is dealing with fingerings on each instrument.

Thanks to everyone for your comments.
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#2292961 - 04/16/11 11:13 PM Re: Doubling on Bass Guitar and Acoustic Bass [Re: johngoldsby]
Nicklab Offline
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Registered: 12/09/03
Posts: 4331
Loc: New Jersey
I play both bass guitar and electric upright bass. In an ideal world I would prefer to play an acoustic upright, but the electric upright has proven to be easier to transport and maintain. The EUB in question is an NS Design WAV4. It works for pizzicato technique, and I'm also able to get a reasonably good bowed sound from this bass.

Would I classify myself as someone who doubles on both bass guitar and the EUB? Not necessarily. My current gig calls for me to play bass guitar primarily. Some of the material works on the upright, and I've been able to play gigs on both bass guitar and upright. But then there's the matter of rehearsals. That's been more trying for me, personally. When you're taking public transportation to rehearsals in NYC, oftentimes the only thing that's feasible is to bring a single instrument.

Gigs are different. I can use my own car to get to gigs. In that case I can bring both the bass guitar and upright along with any amplification needs. I only use one additional piece of gear with the WAV 4, that being a Sadowsky beltpack preamp with volume, bass & treble controls. As far as amplification, I've been fortunate enough to be able to use the same rig for both bass guitar and the EUB. The rig I'm using is light and portable in keeping with the need to be easy to get around a city like New York. It's an Eden WTX-500 amp head paired with an EBS Neo 112 cabinet.

Because I can't rehearse as much with the band using the EUB at this time, it's been seeing less and less gig time. Even though the WAV 4 isn't the size of an acoustic upright, it does seem to have something approaching "doghouse" status because it's just not as easy for me to transport.
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#2292973 - 04/17/11 01:21 AM Re: Doubling on Bass Guitar and Acoustic Bass [Re: johngoldsby]
Jennifer Clark Offline
Member

Registered: 04/14/11
Posts: 8
Loc: Glasgow, Scotland
Hi John,

Doubling allows me to use the best instrument for music I'm playing at the time, and that is a most satisfying thing. Whether it is on a "per gig" basis or a "per song" basis the same applies.

When using both on the same gig I find it can be quite entertaining switching between the two instruments. If I have to do this quickly, for a segue or even during the middle of a song, it can get into the realms of choreography!

For amplification in this situation I favour the use of two full and completely independent rigs, with a separate tuner used for each instrument. From this, I send two feeds to the front of house.

At first I attempted to use a single amp with two inputs, but having to change gain and EQ every time I switched was awkward, and occasionally I would forget to do this, with unpredictable results. Does the preamp on the system you use have independent EQ and gain settings for each channel?

I've been playing bass guitar for over 20 years, and started playing double bass about 5 years ago. On the bass guitar I used double bass (1-2-4) fingering so going onto double bass was not so much of a change there. However, now that I am trying to employ 1-2-3-4 fingering on the bass guitar there is a bit more work.

Ultimately, I think the best approach is to view the double bass and bass guitar as two different instruments, especially with reference to technique. While some efficiency in learning can be made by taking advantage of the commonalities between the two instruments, I find it best in the long term not to compromise if doing so leads to poorer results.

Looking forward to reading your article,

Jennifer
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#2292976 - 04/17/11 01:53 AM Re: Doubling on Bass Guitar and Acoustic Bass [Re: Nicklab]
EddiePlaysBass Offline
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Registered: 06/24/04
Posts: 5986
Loc: Belgium
I have been playing bass for the best part of 9 years now, mostly 5-strings. About 2 years ago I decided - more or less on a whim - to order an NS Design WAV4. My then current band had evolved into a rockabilly band, I figured an upright was the way to go and the WAV offered what seemed to be the best of both worlds (especially with regards to the portability issue). From the get-go I realised that most of the finger patterns I had memorised would be useless because of the longer scale and the "lack" of a B-string. In a way it felt like learning to play a completely different instrument, and it made me rethink my entire approach to the electric bass as well.

My rockabilly band recently split and I have since joined a blues band. For the moment I am holding off bringing the EUB because I want to see where this band is heading. Plus I find I have little spare time on my hands and I do not spend enough time playing said EUB to keep up my chops and not play bum notes the whole time smile
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#2293356 - 04/18/11 09:16 AM Re: Doubling on Bass Guitar and Acoustic Bass [Re: EddiePlaysBass]
johngoldsby Offline
Senior Member

Registered: 02/28/09
Posts: 216
Loc: Cologne, Germany
I am doing the first article with an eye on different fingerings for each instrument. That seems to be where players get hung up the most.
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#2293447 - 04/18/11 12:51 PM Re: Doubling on Bass Guitar and Acoustic Bass [Re: johngoldsby]
Phil W Offline
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Registered: 04/07/05
Posts: 12407
Loc: London, England
I try to focus on first and second fingers where possible on upright and then use Simandl. On elecric, I used to use a modified one finger per fret but following carpal tunnel, Simandl makes more sense on that too except in the highest register.
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#2293454 - 04/18/11 01:01 PM Re: Doubling on Bass Guitar and Acoustic Bass [Re: Phil W]
johngoldsby Offline
Senior Member

Registered: 02/28/09
Posts: 216
Loc: Cologne, Germany
Even though I started on electric with 4-finger technique way back when, now I seem to gravitate towards 3-finger technique in the lower positions. It's more comfortable, if the music is not overly busy with notes.
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#2293516 - 04/18/11 04:29 PM Re: Doubling on Bass Guitar and Acoustic Bass [Re: johngoldsby]
Mark Schmieder Offline
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Registered: 09/08/05
Posts: 8944
Loc: San Francisco Bay Area
I'll try to find time to address the original questions later, but you forgot the most important practical consideration, which is that very few cars will fit an upright bass (that's why I bought the Eminence model, which isn't as wide or deep but is full-scale).
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#2293605 - 04/19/11 12:31 AM Re: Doubling on Bass Guitar and Acoustic Bass [Re: Mark Schmieder]
johngoldsby Offline
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Registered: 02/28/09
Posts: 216
Loc: Cologne, Germany
I like the Eminence Bass . . . it plays nice and sounds good. You're right that transport is a consideration, but a lot of cars will fit a bass.

I've found that a double bass will fit in most cars that at least have a hatch back. They will also fit in the passenger seat of small cars (if the seat reclines all the way). At the moment, I drive a VW Touran, which is a mini-van type car-ish thing, perfect for the URB. But, we also have a Mazda 323. The big bass will go in the passenger seat of the Mazda with the neck angled straight towards the back window over the back seat. Cramped, but it works. I've found that either the hatchback or reclined passenger seat will work in a lot of cars. The cars that won't fit a bass are the ones that do not have a hatch back and that do not have a reclining front passenger seat.

When I lived in NYC, I also had a hatchback Mazda 323 -- the perfect URB car. The taxis in NYC were a little problematic to transport the URB, because I would have to roll down the back window, stick the neck of the bass out the window about 6 inches, and then sit behind it. Nerve wracking, waiting to be decapitated by the neck of the bass if the cabbie had a wreck.
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#2294349 - 04/20/11 05:59 PM Re: Doubling on Bass Guitar and Acoustic Bass [Re: johngoldsby]
gracenotes Offline
Member

Registered: 04/20/11
Posts: 2
I started on electric bass and was grounded in using the 1-2-4 fingering. After several years, I took up URB and learned Simandl fingerings. In switching from one to the other, I do not particularly notice any problems with fingerings. However, the technique is different, although I do not think of the EB as a completely different instrument.

I took my EB to a big band rehearsal this weekend, instead of the upright, and, as far as I remember, I used basically the same fingerings. If the big band starts playing more contemporary pieces, I think I will start doubling. My Acoustic Image amp has two channels, so that will make it easy.

I recently bought a NS Design EUB and I really like the portability of this instrument. I now tend to take this out for rehearsals with my AI amp. For jazz gigs though, I take the upright. There is nothing better sounding, in my opinion, for more traditional straight ahead jazz. I also find that the look of the URB is really appealing to the audience and other musicians. I also play classical bass in some ensembles.

I bought a Toyota Matrix several years ago, and this vehicle, along with great mileage and reliability, is perfect for transporting any kind of bass and amps, etc.

On another related topic, I am happy with the trend towards smaller and lighter instruments and amps, and now upright basses that can be disassembled and put in a box and taken on an airplane.

Look forward to your article, John.

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#2294618 - 04/21/11 02:36 PM Re: Doubling on Bass Guitar and Acoustic Bass [Re: brow6ej]
plangentmusic Offline
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Registered: 02/07/11
Posts: 519
Loc: Manhattan
What a great post. All astute points. Yes, the electric and acoustic are completely different animals, though most upright players regard the electric as "less' significant or "easier." As you point out, that not necessarily the case. VERY few guys do both really well. (Stanley being one of the few who sounds like a true master at both). Some upright players approach the upright like a toy. And consequently, they miss out on the power of the instrument. I play both, but admit, it's the electric that is my voice.

As for the intonation issues, I hear what you're saying though you may want to take another look at your set up. I set the bridge saddle of my E a teeny bit flat -- reason being, in that register, even temperment A 440 becomes a little noticeable and the lower notes are actually sharp.

Best of luck on your electric adventures! : )







Edited by plangentmusic (04/21/11 02:40 PM)
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#2295398 - 04/24/11 08:17 AM Re: Doubling on Bass Guitar and Acoustic Bass [Re: johngoldsby]
tnb Offline
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Registered: 05/08/01
Posts: 2874
Loc: Indianapolis, In, UNITED STATE...
Originally Posted By: johngoldsby
A question to all electric/upright doublers...

I'm curious: What is the most fun, or most satisfying thing about playing both acoustic and electric bass? What are the major problems? Fingering and technique issues? Amplification problems? Do you double on gigs? If so, what kind of equipment setup do you use to easily switch between both instruments?

I'm doing a series of articles for Bass Player on this topic. If anyone has thoughts, feel free to chime in . . . I could use your feedback.



Sorry I'm late.

I love playing bass. I use whatever is the right tool for the song . Sometimes it's upright, sometimes it's electric, sometimes it's tuba. It's usually not my call - I do lots of musical theater and jazz/R&B gigs. That having been said, I enjoy them all equally, even though I am primarily an electric player.

Upright is easily the most problematic. The biggest problem is actually hearing it, which has gotten much easier in the last few years, but that may just be part of the learning curve. Any other problems can be worked out through practice.

For quick switches, there are no substitutes for the right instrument stand and strap locks. One theater I work for built me an incredible stand for my upright, but it is to big and bulky to carry around. For amplification, I've been using a 2 channel Walter Woods rig for over 10 years now. In the last year, the primary signal that goes to the FOH guy is from a microphone. My mic of choice is the Electrovoice RE20. I can run a line to my amp if I absolutely need to, but since a lot of theater and production companies have the Axiom monitoring systems, I use headphones to hear myself.

Another problem with upright is using the bow. There is no pickup that I have heard that works with a bow. In fact, the pickup usually makes even the finest upright player (and I assure you that I am NOT) sound like crap. The microphone fixes this problem. I stopped using the pickup on theater gigs and I'm going to try to stop using it on jazz gigs this summer. If you like, John, I will keep you updated on how that goes wink

Electric is easily amplified. I don't mind hearing it in headphones or a small cabinet. Tuba is easiest. I have never been in a situation on tuba where I couldn't hear myself.

More on the tuba. I started out on tuba. I was a tuba performance major in college. I absolutely love cranking out bass parts on tuba. A lot of time, the parts written for upright, is actually a tuba part, but how many guys are actually doing the upright/tuba double any more? Anyway, the oom-pah parts and a lot of the more melodic stuff really kicks ass AND sits better in the mix on tuba.

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#2295402 - 04/24/11 08:45 AM Re: Doubling on Bass Guitar and Acoustic Bass [Re: tnb]
johngoldsby Offline
Senior Member

Registered: 02/28/09
Posts: 216
Loc: Cologne, Germany
The tuba/bass doubling thing is very cool. I think that doubling skill was more common for players back several decades.

I've got various systems that I use to switch from electric to upright . . . from simple to ridiculously complex, depending what I have to play. For bigger gigs, I use a Glockenklang BassArt with two inputs & attenuation for the electric.

You're right about the bowing with a pickup. I'll still do it, because I like to solo with the bow. Like here.

But things sound better with only a mic, like here.

If I have to pick one or the other, I'll only send mic to FOH on the double bass. If I can trust the sound guy, I will send mic and pickup. The ideal thing for me is DI for electric, DI for acoustic, plus a mic for acoustic. But many sound crews don't want to get so involved . . . they would rather just have one DI for everything that is called a "bass."

The Walter Woods is great . . . I've never run into an Axiom monitor system. Or maybe I have and didn't notice.

Let me know how the "only microphone" thing works for you. That is an option that is worth pursuing.
Thanks,
JG
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#2295436 - 04/24/11 10:37 AM Re: Doubling on Bass Guitar and Acoustic Bass [Re: johngoldsby]
tnb Offline
MP Hall of Fame Member

Registered: 05/08/01
Posts: 2874
Loc: Indianapolis, In, UNITED STATE...
Niiiiiiiice!!! Both link were smoking! And have I mentioned how much I love Lewis Nash?

Sound crews are a whole different topic. Talk about a love/hate relationship. On gigs where you're one of many bands, I have been avoiding those on upright. For me, it is hard enough to play upright without some knucklehead up front, or the monitor guy working against you. You seem to have enough technical headroom to overcome these obstacles. I do not, but I am working on it.

The tuba/upright thing is very old school. I just happened to get lucky.

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#2296677 - 04/27/11 02:01 PM Re: Doubling on Bass Guitar and Acoustic Bass [Re: johngoldsby]
Matt S. Offline
Member

Registered: 04/27/11
Posts: 7
I play both but have studied upright for 17 years. I find that doubling is not a challenge as most modern bass players I started on electric. Getting a music degree and studying classical technique i.e. studying with the bow has helped my intonation tremendously. For some reason I find that when I play pizzicato I can get away from not playing quite as perfectly in tune as when I play with the bow. THE BOW DOES NOT LIE!!!! I also find I can tell when a fellow upright player has learned proper technique and when he or she has not. As far electric goes I have no need to really practice the instrument unless I'm learning some difficult part say for instance "Sir Duke", I had to practice that one. As far as Jazz goes I think the upright sounds wayyyy better for that style of music, and I disagree with the gentleman that says the electric is more efficient for big band. Thanks interesting topic.

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#2296797 - 04/28/11 01:17 AM Re: Doubling on Bass Guitar and Acoustic Bass [Re: Matt S.]
johngoldsby Offline
Senior Member

Registered: 02/28/09
Posts: 216
Loc: Cologne, Germany
Thanks for chiming in Matt. Most players tend towards one or the other. Like you wrote, using correct fingerings/technique for either instrument is important. That said, there are lots of techniques for electric that don't even exist for upright, and obviously upright techniques that don't translate to electric.

@tnb: Lewis Nash is a fine, fine drummer.
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#2296847 - 04/28/11 06:46 AM Re: Doubling on Bass Guitar and Acoustic Bass [Re: brow6ej]
Bob Gollihur Moderator Offline
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Platinum Member

Registered: 11/11/00
Posts: 1208
Loc: Ocean View NJ, USA
Originally Posted By: brow6ej
Hi John,

I am a classically trained double bassist who has recently formed a rock band, playing electric bass.

I thought the transition from upright (which I've been playing most of my life) to electric (which I've always owned but barely touched) would be easy, but it hasn't been. I ran into several problems immediately, and I now regard the electric bass as a completely different instrument demanding a new approach and a different set of musical skills.

The first obstacle for me was dealing with frets. Muscle memory as a classical bassist has allowed me to look up at my music and the conductor and simultaneously throw my finger onto any note with ease. On electric I am constantly looking down to see if my fingers are where they are supposed to be on the fret. Maybe part of this has to do with margin of error... maybe I am more comfortable on a fretless fingerboard because approximate pitch is "good enough" for me, as opposed to the black/white, right/wrong element that frets create. [...snip]
-Eric
(Twitter username: brow6ej)


It is refreshing to hear the same issue I had when moving back to fretted basses. I've played URB for centuries and only owned and gigged fretless electric basses from the around 1972 until 1999, when I bought a fretted fiver, and play them most of the time these days. Since then I find myself looking at the edge of the fingerboard for precise placement in relation to the fret, too, far more often than I want. I've decided to make a concerted effort to abandon that annoying practice.
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#2296997 - 04/28/11 01:39 PM Re: Doubling on Bass Guitar and Acoustic Bass [Re: Bob Gollihur]
Michele C. Offline
Platinum Member

Registered: 02/27/06
Posts: 1021
Loc: Milano
a short sidenote: I do not play upright, but am having fun on a yamaha fretless with Dogal strings. The most striking thing when I listen to an upright bass player is that to me it sounds an octave lower: it is hard to believe that the extension is the same.
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