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Specifically, between the ARP 2600 and Odyssey vs. the Minimoog and Micromoog.

My long time nemesis / back-stage keyboard drinking buddy and I have these long-standing, yearly debates about (among other silly topics) Moog vs. ARP

He was always an ARP champion, and said that ARP's stayed in tune better, sounded better, blah blah blah.

Even though I owned a 2600 for years and years, I am truly a Moog proponent (anyone that buys a Moog is required to use words like "proponent").

To my mind, the Minimoog is capable of getting all the sounds that an Odyssey can get, and the sounds a 2600 can get (without patch-cords).

When you hear a song with a Moog on it, you can tell; when you hear a song with ARP on it, you can tell.

I prefer the Moog sound ~ but have no concerns about missing any ARP sounds because they can be covered comfortably.

Maybe we're snobs, maybe we're geeks. But it is always fun to spot a Moog or ARP on record and see if you can't get that same sound.

Not sure where I am headed with this post, just maybe noting the amazing similarities between the instruments ~ they are not so different as everyone might think. Your thoughts?


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Quote:
Originally posted by [ ]:
Specifically, between the ARP 2600 and Odyssey vs. the Minimoog and Micromoog.

Mini and Micro? Two quite different machines..!

My long time nemesis / back-stage keyboard drinking buddy and I have these long-standing, yearly debates about (among other silly topics) Moog vs. ARP

Well, that was THE debate among keyboardists back in the '70!

He was always an ARP champion, and said that ARP's stayed in tune better, sounded better, blah blah blah.

Staying in tune better and sounding better are two very different things. Someone say early Minimoogs sound better *because* their tuning is unstable.

Even though I owned a 2600 for years and years, I am truly a Moog proponent (anyone that buys a Moog is required to use words like "proponent").

Sadly, I didn't keep my Mini, but now have an SE-1, which is close enough for comparisons. \:\)

To my mind, the Minimoog is capable of getting all the sounds that an Odyssey can get, and the sounds a 2600 can get (without patch-cords).

I think you're way wrong here. What about a sync sound, or a ring-modulated one? Plus, the filters on these two machines sound quite different, and the oscillators, too. The Mini has a spectacular sound quality for sure, but not a great variety of possibilities.

When you hear a song with a Moog on it, you can tell; when you hear a song with ARP on it, you can tell.

Sure! Doesn't this contrast with your previous statement? \:D

I prefer the Moog sound ~ but have no concerns about missing any ARP sounds because they can be covered comfortably.

See before...

Maybe we're snobs, maybe we're geeks. But it is always fun to spot a Moog or ARP on record and see if you can't get that same sound.

Not sure where I am headed with this post, just maybe noting the amazing similarities between the instruments ~ they are not so different as everyone might think. Your thoughts?
It's strange - I've gone thru the same path. I used to be an ARP lover - I liked its quirky, nasal, *different* sound quality. I perceived the Moog sound as more full and 'solar' but also more mainstream. Zawinul was a huge influence - I programmed hundreds of Zawinul imitations on my various synths, starting with the Korg Trident. I invested most of my money on a Rhodes Chroma, because I wanted a polyphonic, programmable ARP 2600.
But nowadays, I'm all for the Moog sound! \:\) Don't ask me why - Maybe as I got older, I became more 'solar' too. \:D That's one of the reasons I'm so in love with the SE-1; it gives me the Moog sound, plus the patching possibilities that the old Mini doesn't have.

Also, let's not forget that today, there are dozens of other excellent synthesizers!! \:\)

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I think the MiniMoog has the edge in sound for lead and bass. It is hard to match those leads from the 80's. But, just listen to the synth break in the middle of Frankenstein by Edger Winter and you will hear the advantages of a deeply programmable synth.

I will not worry which is best, just give me both and a tech to keep them in shape.

Robert


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They really do have their own character. Hell, my first Arp Odyssey had a 12dB/8va filter, not 24dB like the later machines.

The 600 was WAY moe flexible than the Mini, tho the Mini had a ballsier sound for bass and the like.

But I combined my 2600 (modified for separate AR and ADSR triggers and a custom LFO) with the Roland System 100 (patch cord and trigger compatble) for an awesome analog rig... The Roland sounded nothing like either Arp or Moog, and had a stepped sequencer to die for!

Dasher


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Sounds kinda like the Mac vs. PC debate.

I liked them both. My first synth was an Arp Odyssey. I have had several Mini Moogs and also a Memory Moog. I owned a 2600 and through some serious modifications found a way to have both.

I had the Moog filters added to the 2600 and a switch installed that allowed me to use the Arp filters when switched to the left and the Moog filters when switched to the right.

The best example of this synth is the bassline I played on Madonna's first record. On "Lucky Star", I used the Moog filter side of the 2600 and on "Borderline" I used the Arp side. "Borderline", however was a doubled bass line played live together in the studio, with myself and Anthony Jackson. (one of the most fun sessions I have ever done).


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